undertoe

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undertoe

(ŭn′dĕr-tō) [″ + ta, toe]
The displacement of the great toe underneath the others.
References in periodicals archive ?
Another weak force is advection, which occurs as the undertow is sucked into the larger current created by the waves.
The undertow (THC) current must reach the surface, allowing investors to make rational investments.
At that moment, the undertow again released Balch and she bobbed to the surface like a cork.
A mighty undertow draws the unsuspecting bather into the depths, even unto death.
Even more than Bronislava Nijinska, the ballet's first choreographer, Bejart caught the score's powerful sexual undertow.
But, in the meantime, blacks, experts say, are more vulnerable to getting sucked down by the economic undertow than any other group.
Weather on the SAN has been choppy at best, with sudden squalls and a constant undertow by those vendors who believe in controlling the marketplace and getting standards neatly aligned behind them.
Steel calls Robert Kennedy the most avid believer in the Kennedy myth of innocent hope, but he also acknowledges that Kennedy avoided discussion of his brother's assassination in part because he felt the undertow of hidden government earlier and more keenly than the rest of us.
There is now a rolling undertow in many of the news stories about East European countries, particularly Russia: Capitalism is by its nature corrupt, and only a generous dollop of governmental control - a check on the thugs who inevitably rule the marketplace - can save the wretched masses since the communist state has withered away.
She also argues that our response to these changes in family life ought not to consist of shaming and blaming the couples, parents, and children caught in the undertow of recent and enduring economic downturns.
Like a silent undertow, anxiety about race and racial mixing tugs at the narratives of most nineteenth-century canonical American writers, even when it seems not to be their subject.
In practice, this division, has, up to now, resulted in his writing in two distinct modes: the neolyrics found in parts 1 and 3 of The Undertow and the "language poems" collected in the second part.