undercorrection

undercorrection

(ŭn″dĕr-kŏ-rĕk′shŭn)
In refractive eye surgeries such as LASIK, too small a change in shape of the cornea that results in inadequate focusing of light rays (failure of light to fall onto the retina).

undercorrection 

A term applied to a corrective lens prescription of slightly lower power than required. It has been prescribed in an unsuccessful attempt to slow the progression of myopia in children because it reduces the accommodative stimulus. See myopic defocus; myopia control.
References in periodicals archive ?
Potential LASIK-related applications for the KeraVision technology include treating people with post-LASIK complications such as corneal thinning, undercorrection and visual regression - that is, cases where prescription inserts might be used to reshape a damaged cornea.
These patients need to know that this undercorrection may be noticeable in mesopic conditions.
There was consistent undercorrection after dome osteotomy, with an average alignment of a varus of 1.
With undercorrection, opticians try to stop the eyeball elongating by prescribing a lens that focuses light from distant objects just in front of the retina rather than directly on it.
Why does undercorrection not reduce its progression?
Some of the risks of poorly performed LASIK surgery include blindness, severe infection, significant undercorrection, significant overcorrection, severe dry eyes, impaired night vision, double vision, and seeing “halos” and “starbursts.
The use of the Bazett formula results in an overcorrection of the QT interval at higher heart rates and undercorrection at lower heart rates.
Cyclotorsion in particular can result in misalignment, producing undercorrection of astigmatism.
A 2008 American Journal of Ophthalmology report found that 28% of eyes treated with Lasik required additional surgeries less than ten years after the initial surgery due to undercorrection, overcorrection, or regression.
In a small number refractive eye surgery cases--usually, the patients, who are very young, very near-sighted or very farsighted--overcorrection or undercorrection of vision occurs.
Cosmetic concerns are one of the most common reasons for undercorrection.
Another visual therapy, the See Clearly Method by Vision Improvement Technologies, is built upon the basic principles of Bates but also advocates "progressive undercorrection," a process that uses steadily weaker prescriptions to blur vision and strengthen the accommodative (focusing) muscles in the eye.