ointment

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Related to uncture: acupuncture, juncture, puncture

ointment

 [oint´ment]
a semisolid preparation for external application to the skin or mucous membranes. Official ointments consist of medicinal substances incorporated in suitable vehicles (bases). Called also salve and unguent.

oint·ment

(oynt'ment),
A semisolid preparation usually containing medicinal substances and intended for external application. Ointment bases used as vehicles fall into four general classes: 1) hydrocarbon bases (oleaginous ointment bases) keep medicaments in prolonged contact with the skin, act as occlusive dressings, and are used chiefly for emollient effects; 2) absorption bases either permit the incorporation of aqueous solutions with the formation of a water-in-oil emulsion or are water-in-oil emulsions that permit the incorporation of additional quantities of aqueous solutions; such bases permit better absorption of some medicaments and are useful as emollients; 3) water-removable bases (creams) are oil-in-water emulsions containing petrolatum, anhydrous lanolin, or waxes; they may be washed from the skin with water and are thus more acceptable for cosmetic reasons; they favor absorption of serous discharges in dermatologic conditions; and 4) water-soluble bases (greaseless ointment bases) contain only water-soluble substances.
See also: cerate.
Synonym(s): salve, uncture, unguent
[O. Fr. oignement; L. unguo, pp. unctus, to smear]

ointment

/oint·ment/ (oint´ment) a semisolid preparation for external application to the skin or mucous membranes, usually containing a medicinal substance.

ointment

(oint′mənt)
n.
A highly viscous or semisolid substance used on the skin as a cosmetic, emollient, or medicament; a salve.

ointment

Etymology: L, unguentum, a salve
a semisolid, externally applied preparation, usually containing a drug. Various ointments are used as local analgesic, anesthetic, antibiotic, astringent, depigmenting, irritant, and keratolytic agents. Also called salve, unction, unguent.

ointment

Chinese medicine
A general term for any of a number of therapeutic balms that are applied topically for various complaints; an ointment consists of a finely ground herbal powder in any of a number of oil bases, including almond oil, beeswax, lanolin, lard, petroleum jelly and sesame oil.

Herbal medicine
A mixture of herbs heated in cocoa butter, lanolin, oils or hardeners (e.g., beeswax) and applied externally—e.g., for bites, burns, cuts and haemorrhoids.

ointment

Mainstream medicine A medicated formulation with an oil base; in contrast, creams are water-soluble

oint·ment

(oynt'mĕnt)
A semisolid preparation usually containing medicinal substances and intended for external application.
Synonym(s): salve, unguent.
[O. Fr. oignement; L. unguo, pp. unctus, to smear]

ointment

A semisolid, viscous material consisting of one or more substances with medicinal properties thoroughly mixed with a suitable base. Ointment bases may be of hard paraffin, emulsions of oil in water (aqueous creams), vegetable oils, wool fat (lanolin) or other substances. Ointments are used on the skin and in the eyes.

Ointment

A thick, spreadable substance that contains medicine and is meant to be used on the skin, or, if it is specifically an ophthalmic, or "eye" ointment, in the eye

oint·ment

(oynt'mĕnt)
Semisolid preparation usually containing medicinal substances, intended for external application.
[O. Fr. oignement; L.unguo, pp. unctus, to smear]

ointment (oint´ment),

n a soft, bland, smooth, semisolid mixture that is used as a lubricant and as a vehicle for external medication.
ointment, hydrophilic,
n an ointment that is miscible with water.

ointment

a semisolid preparation for external application to the body. Official ointments consist of medicinal substances incorporated in suitable vehicles (bases).

Patient discussion about ointment

Q. the substitue ointment for lasonil

A. the active material in it is heparinoid, and if i'm not mistaken there are 2 other creams that uses it. just ask the pharmacist, he is the most qualified to help you.

More discussions about ointment