unconsciousness


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unconsciousness

 [un-kon´shus-nes]
an abnormal state of lack of response to sensory stimuli, resulting from injury, illness, shock, or some other bodily disorder. A brief loss of consciousness from which the person recovers spontaneously or with slight help is called syncope or faint. Deep, prolonged unconsciousness is known as coma. See also levels of consciousness.

un·con·scious·ness

(ŭn-kon'shŭs-ness),
An imprecise term for severely impaired awareness of self and the surrounding environment; most often used as a synonym for coma or unresponsiveness.

unconsciousness

[unkon′shəsnəs]
a state of complete or partial unawareness or lack of response to sensory stimuli as a result of hypoxia caused by respiratory insufficiency or shock; from metabolic or chemical brain depressants such as drugs, poisons, ketones, or electrolyte imbalance; or from a form of brain pathological condition such as trauma, seizures, cerebrovascular accident, brain tumor, or infection. Various degrees of unconsciousness can occur during stupor, fugue, catalepsy, and dream states. See also coma.

un·con·scious·ness

(ŭn-kon'shŭs-nĕs)
An imprecise term for severely impaired awareness of the self and the surrounding environment; most often used as a synonym for coma or unresponsiveness.

unconsciousness

A state of unrousability caused by brain damage and associated with reduced activity in part of the BRAINSTEM called the reticular formation. Unconsciousness varies in depth from a light state, in which the unconscious person responds to stimuli by moving or protesting, to a state of profound coma in which even the strongest stimuli evoke no response. Causes include head injury, inadequate blood supply to the brain, fainting, asphyxia, poisoning, near drowning, starvation, low blood sugar (HYPOGLYCAEMIA) and severe KETOSIS.

un·con·scious·ness

(ŭn-kon'shŭs-nĕs)
An imprecise term for severely impaired awareness of self and surrounding environment; most often used as a synonym for coma.

unconsciousness

an abnormal state of lack of response to sensory stimuli, resulting from injury, illness, shock or some other bodily disorder. A brief loss of unconsciousness from which the animal recovers spontaneously or with slight aid is called fainting. Deep, prolonged unconsciousness is known as coma. See also levels of consciousness.
References in classic literature ?
He had no large knowledge of any subject, though he had looked into many just far enough to replace absolute unconsciousness of them with measurable ignorance.
Let us reflect in another way, and we shall see that there is great reason to hope that death is a good; for one of two things--either death is a state of nothingness and utter unconsciousness, or, as men say, there is a change and migration of the soul from this world to another.
Toward the middle of the day many of the weaker commenced to succumb and within an hour the people of Barsoom were sinking by thousands into the unconsciousness which precedes death by asphyxiation.
He must fill his days with labor and excitement that he might forget--that night might find him so exhausted that he should sleep in blessed unconsciousness of his misery until a new day had come.
Forth trundled the cab into the Christmas streets, the fare within plunged in the blackness of a despair that neighboured on unconsciousness, the driver on the box digesting his rebuke and his customer's duplicity.
Then my brain grew calmer, my imagination wandered into vague unconsciousness, and I soon fell into a deep sleep.
He consigned his unknown persecutors to the most horrible tortures he could imagine, and found them all insufficient, because after torture came death, and after death, if not repose, at least the boon of unconsciousness.
The sign is so slight, it is scarcely perceptible to the ear or eye--he could describe it to no one--it is a mere feather-touch, yet it seems to have changed his whole being, to have merged an uneasy yearning into a delicious unconsciousness of everything but the present moment.
They were each and all supposed to have been reared in utter unconsciousness of vice.
Amid frequent and thoughtful endeavors to remember; amid earnest struggles to regather some token of the state of seeming nothingness into which my soul had lapsed, there have been moments when I have dreamed of success; there have been brief, very brief periods when I have conjured up remembrances which the lucid reason of a later epoch assures me could have had reference only to that condition of seeming unconsciousness.
The distance was not so great but the figure of Judge Temple could be seen, standing in his own grounds, and apparently contemplating, in perfect unconsciousness of the danger of his child, the mountain in flames.
Because of the absence of all trimming round the neck and from the deep view of her bare arms in the wide sleeve this garment seemed to be put directly on her skin and gave one the impression of one's nearness to her body which would have been troubling but for the perfect unconsciousness of her manner.