unconscious


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to unconscious: collective unconscious

unconscious

 [un-kon´shus]
1. insensible; incapable of responding to sensory stimuli and of having subjective experiences.
2. the part of the mind that is not readily accessible to conscious awareness by ordinary means but whose existence may be manifested in symptom formation, in dreams, or under the influence of drugs; it is one of the systems of Freud's topographic model of the mind.
collective unconscious in jungian psychology, the portion of the unconscious that is theoretically common to mankind.

un·con·scious

(ŭn-kon'shŭs),
1. Not conscious.
2. In psychoanalysis, the psychic structure comprising the drives and feelings of which one is unaware.
Synonym(s): insensible (1)

unconscious

/un·con·scious/ (un-kon´shus)
1. insensible; incapable of responding to sensory stimuli and of having subjective experiences.
2. the part of the mind not readily accessible to conscious awareness but whose existence may be manifested in symptom formation, in dreams, or under the influence of drugs.

collective unconscious  the elements of the unconscious that are theoretically common to mankind.

unconscious

(ŭn-kŏn′shəs)
adj.
1. Lacking awareness and the capacity for sensory perception; not conscious.
2. Temporarily lacking consciousness.
3. Occurring in the absence of conscious awareness or thought: unconscious resentment; unconscious fears.
4. Without conscious control; involuntary or unintended: an unconscious mannerism.
n.
The division of the mind in psychoanalytic theory containing elements of psychic makeup, such as memories or repressed desires, that are not subject to conscious perception or control but that often affect conscious thoughts and behavior.

un·con′scious·ly adv.
un·con′scious·ness n.

unconscious

[unkon′shəs]
Etymology: ME, un + L, conscire, to be aware
1 unaware of the surrounding environment; insensible; incapable of responding to sensory stimuli.
2 (in psychiatry) the part of the mental function in which thoughts, ideas, emotions, or memories are beyond awareness and rarely subject to ready recall. It contains data that have never been conscious or that were conscious at one time, usually for a brief period, and later repressed. Compare preconscious. See also collective unconscious, personal unconscious.

unconscious

adjective
1. Not conscious, referring to a reflex movement.
2. The psychic structure(s), per the psychoanalytic construct, of which a person is unaware Psychiatry That part of the mind or mental functioning of which the content is only rarely subject to awareness; it is a repository for data that have never been conscious–primary repression or that may have been conscious briefly and later repressed–secondary repression.

un·con·scious

(ŭn-kon'shŭs)
1. Not conscious; lacking awareness.
2. psychoanalysis The psychic structure comprising the drives and feelings of which one is unaware.
Synonym(s): insensible (1) .

unconscious

1. Pertaining to a person lacking awareness or to mental processes that proceed outside consciousness.
2. A person's total memory store, whether immediately accessible or not.
3. The domain of the psyche, characterized by Freud (see FREUDIAN THEORY) as having a content that was not accessible because it was unacceptable and thus repressed. Compare CONSCIOUS, SUBCONSCIOUS.

unconscious,

n in hypnotherapy, the unconscious is viewed as sensory information not in current awareness.

un·con·scious

(ŭn-kon'shŭs)
1. Not conscious.
2. In psychoanalysis, the psychic structure comprising the drives and feelings of which one is unaware.
Synonym(s): insensible (1) .

unconscious (unkon´shəs),

adj insensible; not receiving any sensory impression and not having any subjective experiences.

unconscious

insensible; incapable of responding to sensory stimuli and of having subjective experiences.
References in classic literature ?
Scrambling to his feet, Numa looked about quickly in all directions, as though seeking to detect the possible presence of other foes; but only the still and unconscious form of the girl, lying a few paces from him met his gaze, and with an angry growl he placed a forepaw upon the body of his kill and raising his head gave voice to his savage victory cry.
I was struck by a bullet and have been unconscious.
But, for our purpose, a kind of Selection, which may be called Unconscious, and which results from every one trying to possess and breed from the best individual animals, is more important.
If there exist savages so barbarous as never to think of the inherited character of the offspring of their domestic animals, yet any one animal particularly useful to them, for any special purpose, would be carefully preserved during famines and other accidents, to which savages are so liable, and such choice animals would thus generally leave more offspring than the inferior ones; so that in this case there would be a kind of unconscious selection going on.
All the virtues peculiar to the sect to which she belonged shone in her, but she seemed to be unconscious of her merit.
How many times I have tried to set forth my soul in my eyes or on my lips, compelled at once to speak and to be silent concerning my passion; for the young girl who, in my presence, was always serene and unconscious had not been informed of the reason of my constant visits; her parents were determined that the most important decision of her life should rest entirely with her.
From my fuller knowledge of the creature I now know that the posture was unconscious.
The chin, with the damp black beard, pointed higher in the air as the back muscles stiffened and the chest swelled in an unconscious and instinctive effort to get more air.
And unconscious envy is in the sidelong look of your contempt.
They groped their way towards the unconscious man, Gerald still gripping the dressing-case with both hands.
It is matter of common observation that "so-and-so does not know his own motives," or that "A is envious of B and malicious about him, but quite unconscious of being so.
She looked so innocent and unconscious when she turned her eyes on Joe, that it was quite provoking.