uncompensated care


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Related to uncompensated care: Charity care

uncompensated care

[unkom′pənsā′tid]
Etymology: ME, un, against, not; L, compendere, to be equivalent
services provided by a hospital or other health care professional for which no charge is made and for which no payment is expected.

uncompensated care

Medical treatment of a Pt provided in the US by a physician or other health care professional that is not paid by the Pt, the government, or an insurance carrier Types Charity care, bad debt, discounted Medicaid care. See Medicaid, 'Service' patient. Cf Pro bono.

uncompensated care

Health care provided to those who are uninsured and unable to pay for the services they receive. In the U.S. most uncompensated care is provided for in a relatively small number of urban hospitals.
See also: care

uncompensated care,

n health care services provided by a hospital, physician, dental professional, or other health care professional for which no charge is made and for which no payment is expected.
References in periodicals archive ?
In theory, new Medicare pay rules that leave uncompensated care out of reimbursement arrangements could make specialties such as emergency care and urgent care less attractive, and specialties that give physicians more time to analyze incoming patients' finances more attractive.
The decision to provide uncompensated care is viewed as a "business decision" that may improve a hospital's standing in the community or relationship with physicians (Gray 1991).
A 2013 study by Ashish Jha, a professor at the Harvard School of Public Health, found that hospitals with high, uncompensated care loads also saw their Medicare reimbursements drop by 0.
1) The program supported about 36% of total uncompensated care costs for hospitals in 2001 and about 30% in 2008 (Hadley et al.
Uncompensated care is inefficient spending on health care.
That's because the cost of expanding health insurance under the law is far higher than the cost of uncompensated care.
Providers attempt to recover these uncompensated care dollars primarily by increasing charges for those with private insurance," according to the report.
Previously, with the Uncompensated Care Pool, hospitals were prohibited from billing anyone at or below 200 percent of federal poverty.
Although survey data from the American Hospital Association indicate that the amount of uncompensated care provided by hospitals, regardless of ownership status, has increased by $5.
In 2001, when we had millions fewer illegal immigrants than we do now, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies put the total uncompensated care for the uninsured at $35 billion, meaning that illegal immigrants ran up a bill of between $4.
Trautman said corporation-wide, UHS had about $597 million in uncompensated care.
Because of the recent government move of welfare to work, uncompensated care has now spiraled out of control.