uncompensated care


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Related to uncompensated care: Charity care

uncompensated care

[unkom′pənsā′tid]
Etymology: ME, un, against, not; L, compendere, to be equivalent
services provided by a hospital or other health care professional for which no charge is made and for which no payment is expected.

uncompensated care

Medical treatment of a Pt provided in the US by a physician or other health care professional that is not paid by the Pt, the government, or an insurance carrier Types Charity care, bad debt, discounted Medicaid care. See Medicaid, 'Service' patient. Cf Pro bono.

uncompensated care

Health care provided to those who are uninsured and unable to pay for the services they receive. In the U.S. most uncompensated care is provided for in a relatively small number of urban hospitals.
See also: care

uncompensated care,

n health care services provided by a hospital, physician, dental professional, or other health care professional for which no charge is made and for which no payment is expected.
References in periodicals archive ?
Approximately 78 percent of SCO's uncompensated care was provided through professional services in one of the college's clinical facilities.
9 billion for uncompensated care by way of the 1115 waiver.
The uncompensated care fund dollars were matched with federal funds back to the hospitals.
The bulk of that uncompensated care was bad debt - $12.
During the latest quarter, uncompensated care was 10.
First one must explain what falls under uncompensated care and why it is on the rise.
Looking over the next several years to 2012, Montana's annual uncompensated care costs show a price tag of $1,528 for every one of the approximately 170,000 uninsured Montanans throughout the state.
2 percent of immigrants who entered in the 1970s were still uninsured, meaning that most of the $35 billion in uncompensated care in 2001 likely went to legal immigrants--along with many billions in increased Medicaid payments.
Recently, these insurers have started to reduce their participation for social goods such as uncompensated care and GME as a component of their premium costs, This is particularly true of managed care programs.
However, if NPs (or one NP) dominate a market, they may "extend" this "trustworthiness" to the entire local hospital sector by setting community norms for uncompensated care provision, community benefits, and quality.
This is due to both an expected boost in healthcare utilization and amelioration of levels of uncompensated care for healthcare service providers.