two-vessel disease

two-vessel disease

Coronary heart disease in which two coronary arteries have significant narrowing/stenosis. Two-vessel disease may be managed by bypass, as well as by stenting or angioplasty.
References in periodicals archive ?
Significant stenosis of the left main coronary artery was assigned as two-vessel disease.
Two-vessel disease involving the left anterior descending and right coronary arteries was detected on CTCA in two patients.
Based on angiography results, patients with either single or two-vessel disease underwent percutaneous coronary intervention with drug-eluting stent implantation.
Thirteen percent of FREEDOM participants had two-vessel disease, and the rest had triple-vessel disease.
6) can be considered within the indication of class IIA of asymptomatic coronary artery two-vessel disease.
Coronary revascularization prior to noncardiac surgery is useful in patients with angina and the following limited circumstances: significant left main coronary stenosis, three-vessel disease, two-vessel disease including proximal left anterior descending coronary artery stenosis with left ventricular ejection fraction under 50% or ischemia on noninvasive testing, high-risk unstable angina, or acute MI.
PCI patients were more likely to have one- or two-vessel disease, and bypass grafting most often was performed for two- or three-vessel disease.
Among patients with two-vessel disease, CABG conferred a highly significant 32% reduced risk of death.
In the multicenter series, 54% of patients had triple-vessel disease and 46% had two-vessel disease.
Most of the physicians were overly pessimistic about the survival of patients whose angina is managed medically, judging 5-year survival to be less than 60% in three-vessel disease and less than 70% in two-vessel disease when the actual rates are above 80% and greater than 85%, respectively.