goldenseal

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goldenseal

/gol·den·seal/ (gōl´den-sēl″) the North American herb Hydrastis canadensis, or its dried rhizome, a preparation of which is used in folk medicine and in homeopathy.

goldenseal

(gōl′dən-sēl′)
n.
A North American woodland plant (Hydrastis canadensis) in the buttercup family, having small greenish-white flowers and a yellow root used in herbal medicine.

goldenseal

a perennial herb found in the Ohio River valley.
uses It is used for high blood pressure, poor appetite, infections, menstrual problems, minor sciatic pain, and muscle spasms. It is also used as an eye wash and by some hoping to hide the presence of marijuana, cocaine, or other illicit drugs in the urine. Goldenseal is ineffective at masking illicit drugs in urine tests. There is insufficient reliable information to gauge its efficacy for other uses.
contraindications It is probably not safe when used at high doses or long term. The active constituent berberine can cause significant toxicity. Goldenseal is contraindicated in women who are pregnant (it is a uterine stimulant) or breastfeeding, and it should not be used in infants. It also should not be used in people with known hypersensitivity to this herb or with cardiovascular conditions such as heart block, arrhythmias, or hypertension. It should not be used locally for purulent ear discharge or in a ruptured ear drum.
A perennial herb that contains alkaloids—e.g., berberine and canadine, resin, and volatile oil, regarded by Native American medicine men as antimicrobial, antituberculotic, antiseptic, haemostatic, and a liver tonic
Toxicity It should not be used in pregnancy, as it may stimulate uterine contractions
Contraindications Diabetes, glaucoma, coronary artery disease, atherosclerosis, hypertension, prior stroke

gol·den·seal

(gōld'ĕn sēl)
(Hydrastis canadensis) Herbal remedy that claims unsubstantiated benefit in treatment of anorexia nervosa, cancer, gastrointestinal disease, pruritus, and other conditions. Widely reported adverse effects (e.g., seizures, cardiac problems, respiratory depression). Death has been reported after overdose. Among the most commonly used of all herbal preparations.
Synonym(s): eye balm, yellow paint, yellow puccoon.

goldenseal,

n Latin name:
Hydrastis canadensis; part used: rhizomes (dried); uses: antimicrobial, expec-torant, antiinflammatory, gastritis, digestive and oral ulcers, bladder infections, sore throat, epidermal infections, cancer, tuberculosis; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children; patients with heart conditions or ruptured eardrums; not recommended for more than 6 weeks at one time, can cause bradycardia, asystole, an-xiety, convulsions, nausea, diarrhea, stomach cramps, and paralysis (elevated doses). Also called
eye balm, eye root, goldsiegel, ground raspberry, Indian dye, Indian paint, Indian turmeric, jaundice root, orange root, turmeric root, yellow paint, yellow puccoon, yellow root, warnera, and
wild curcuma.
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