turgor


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turgor

 [ter´ger]
1. swelling or other distention.
2. a condition of normal tension in a cell or group of cells; fullness. adj., adj tur´gid.
skin turgor a reflection of the skin's elasticity, measured by monitoring the time it takes for the skin of the forearm to return to position after it is lightly pinched between the examiner's thumb and forefinger. Normal turgor is a return to normal contour within three seconds; if the skin remains elevated (tented) more than three seconds, turgor is decreased.
Assessing skin turgor. From Lammon et al., 1995.

tur·gor

(tŭr'gōr),
Fullness.
[L., fr. turgeo, to swell]

turgor

/tur·gor/ (-ger) condition of being turgid; normal, or other fullness.

turgor

(tûr′gər, -gôr′)
n.
The normal fullness or tension produced by the fluid content of living cells or of blood vessels and capillaries: leaves that have lost turgor.

turgor

[tur′gər]
Etymology: L, turgere, to be swollen
the expected resiliency of the skin caused by the outward pressure of the cells and interstitial fluid. Dehydration results in decreased skin turgor, manifested by lax skin that, when grasped and raised between two fingers, slowly returns to a position level with the adjacent tissue. Marked edema or ascites results in increased turgor manifested by smooth, taut, shiny skin that cannot be grasped and raised. Elderly people normally do not have "good" skin turgor because of a lack of skin elasticity, an expected part of aging. An evaluation of the skin turgor is an essential part of physical assessment.

turgor

Physical examination Swelling of skin and subcutaneous tissue

tur·gor

(tŭr'gŏr)
Fullness.
[L., fr. turgeo, to swell]

turgor

the cell state when it has taken in a maximum amount of water, causing distension of the protoplast. The term is used mainly in connection with plant cells, which have a maximum size when turgid that is governed by how much the cellulose cell wall will stretch. See WALL PRESSURE, PRESSURE POTENTIAL, TRANSPIRATION.

tur·gor

(tŭr'gŏr)
Fullness.
[L., fr. turgeo, to swell]

turgor (tur´gər),

n the normal resiliency of the skin caused by the outward pressure of the cells and interstitial fluid. Dehydration results in a decreased skin turgor, manifested by lax skin that, when grasped and raised between two fingers, slowly returns to a position level with the adjacent tissue.

turgor

the condition of being turgid; normal or other fullness.
References in periodicals archive ?
From test day 1, and every other day following, samples were collected and examined visually for organoleptic quality (brown spots, soft spots, wilting/loss of turgor, visible indicators of microbial growth, etc.
The Nurse practictioner, in order to meet the applicable standard of care, is required to conduct a physical examination of the child that includes assessment of mental status (including signs of lethargy or anxiety), vital signs on admission and discharge (including whether mucous membranes are moist or dry and whether the eyes are sunken), and a general assessment of skin turgor (including temperature, heart rate, respiratory rate and blood pressure), and a general assessment of the ears, throat, heart, lungs, abdomen and extremities.
Plant turgor pressures will also eventually reduce under declining water availability so that plant shoot and root growth will decrease, although plants tend to partially compensate with an increased root: shoot ratio (Tinker and Nye 2000; He et al.
g], where [pi], p, m, [chi], g correspond to osmotic, hydrostatic (due to the intracellular turgor pressure), matrix (interaction with molecular structures and surfaces), humidity, and gravitation potentials.
Thus in turgor state, it helps in absorption of more sunlight and solar radiation, which would result in higher rate of photosynthesis and increased photosynthetic capacity ultimately leading to higher dry matter accumulation in plants under shade net condition (Table 2), (Mc Williams, E.
Its liquidity and incompressibility impart it with turgor pressure, the ability to cause rigidity in the fluid state when it is put under pressure.
change in skin turgor of the breastbone or forehead
It is important to mount larva without injury, because the internal structures cannot be seen if turgor is not maintained.
Elders may bruise because of poor skin and subcutaneous tissue turgor, decreased fatty tissue, ambulatory problems relating to cognitive impairment, neurologic or physical disorders, effects of medications and nutritional factors.