tuberosity

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Related to tuberosities: ischial, Trochanters

tuberosity

 [too″bĕ-ros´ĭ-te]
an elevation or protuberance, especially one on a bone where a muscle is attached; see also tuber and tubercle.

tu·ber·os·i·ty

(tū'bĕr-os'i-tē), [TA]
A large tubercle or rounded elevation, especially from the surface of a bone.
Synonym(s): tuberositas [TA]

tuberosity

/tu·be·ros·i·ty/ (-te) an elevation or protuberance, especially one on a bone where a muscle is attached.

tuberosity

(to͞o′bə-rŏs′ĭ-tē, tyo͞o′-)
n. pl. tuberosi·ties
1. The quality or condition of being tuberous.
2. A projection or protuberance, especially one at the end of a bone for the attachment of a muscle or tendon.

tuberosity

[t(y)o̅o̅′bəros′itē]
Etymology: L, tuber
an elevation or protuberance, especially of a bone.

tu·ber·os·i·ty

(tū'bĕr-os'i-tē) [TA]
A large tubercle or rounded elevation, especially from the surface of a bone.
Synonym(s): tuberositas.

tuberosity

Any prominence on a bone to which tendons are attached.

tuberosity

large tubercle/rounded elevation from bone; serves as attachment for tendon/fascia
  • calcaneal tuberosities pair of tuberosities (medial tuberosity larger than lateral) located at plantar aspect of calcaneum; origin of plantar fascia

  • tibial tuberosity tuberosity at anterior aspect of proximal end of tibia; insertion of patellar tendon

tu·ber·os·i·ty

(tū'bĕr-os'i-tē) [TA]
A large tubercle or rounded elevation, especially from bone surface.

tuberosity (toobəros´itē),

n a protuberance or elevation from the surface, usually of a bone.
tuberosity, maxillary,
n the most distal aspect of the maxillary alveolar process, with its posterior border curving upward and distally.
tuberosity reduction,
n a surgical excision of excessive fibrous or bony tissue in the area of the maxillary tuberosity before the construction of prosthetic appliances.

tuberosity

an elevation or protuberance.

deltoid tuberosity
a prominence on the lateral aspect of the humerus; the point of attachment of the deltoid muscle.
facial tuberosity
a discrete elevation on the maxilla of cows which serves as an attachment for the rostral part of the masseter muscle.
ischial tuberosity
the pin bone; the most caudal process of the ischium.
olecranon tuberosity
the free end of the ulna; point of attachment of the triceps brachii muscle.
radial tuberosity
a rough patch on the cranial aspect of the proximal end of the radius.
tibial tuberosity
prominent tuberosity protruding from the cranial aspect of the proximal end of the tibia onto which the patellar ligament inserts.
References in periodicals archive ?
As mentioned previously, Kosiak undertook seminal research by applying loads to the trochanters and ischial tuberosities of dogs [1].
Other investigators, such as Micic50 and Clavert, (51) also found that early post-operative failures of the locking plate were associated with initial malreduction, poor operative technique (including inadequate screw length or plate positioning), loss of medial support, and failure to adequately fix the tuberosities.
Contact pressures (mean [+ or -] standard deviation) under ischial tuberosities for subjects (N = 10) while sitting on each studied cushions.
Prior to the study, the probes of the O2C were securely attached to the skin with adhesive medical tape right beneath the ischial tuberosities.
One FSR was attached to the seat pan underneath the cushion where one of the subject's ischial tuberosities would approximately rest, and the other two FSRs were affixed where the subject's thighs would rest.
However, if a tear cannot be repaired primarily to the tuberosities despite all mobilization techniques, then the patient may require a salvage-type reconstruction in order to restore some level of function and reduce pain.
Such patients, who lack natural sensations of discomfort and pain, may experience prolonged compression of soft tissues under their ischial tuberosities (IT) [11].
A horizontal line was drawn through the bottom of the ischial tuberosities.
We studied how neuromuscular stimulation through a magnetic coil and a sacral anterior root stimulator (SARS) implant (used for bladder emptying) affects pressure and skin blood circulation under the ischial tuberosities (ITs) of participants with spinal cord injury (SCI).
The ascending branch of the anterior humeral circumflex enters the proximal humerus at the upper end of the bicipital groove or via branches into the greater and lesser tuberosities.
Pressures and skin blood circulation under ischial tuberosities before and during functional magnetic stimulation (FMS) of five subjects with spinal cord injury.
Many investigators stress the importance of adequate fixation of the tuberosities and note the importance of proper placement of the greater tuberosity in an anatomic position, approximately 5 mm beneath the most superior projection of the humeral head.
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