tuberculous meningitis


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tu·ber·cu·lous men·in·gi·tis

inflammation of the cerebral leptomeninges marked by the presence of granulomatous inflammation; it is usually confined to the base of the brain (basilar meningitis, internal hydrocephalus) and is accompanied in children by an accumulation of spinal fluid in the ventricles (acute hydrocephalus).
Synonym(s): cerebral tuberculosis (1)

tuberculous meningitis

tuberculous meningitis

Neurology M tuberculosis meningitis caused by spread from elsewhere in the body Risk factors Hx pulmonary tuberculosis, alcoholism, AIDS. See Meningitis Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

tu·ber·cu·lous men·in·gi·tis

(tū-bĕr'kyū-lŭs men'in-jī'tis)
Inflammation of the cerebral leptomeninges marked by the presence of granulomatous inflammation; it is usually confined to the base of the brain (basilar meningitis, internal hydrocephalus) and is accompanied in children by an accumulation of spinal fluid in the ventricles (acute hydrocephalus).
References in periodicals archive ?
Factors influencing shunt malfunction in patients with tuberculous meningitis.
Brucella encephalitis and tuberculous meningitis stood out as important entities that should be noted in the Turkish population.
Predictors of outcome in patients with tuberculous meningitis," International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, vol.
There is a possibility of future complications with cerebral tuberculomas, even after a correct treatment of the tuberculous meningitis.
Spinal tuberculous arachnoiditis, more commonly known as tuberculous radiculomyelitis (TBRM) is a rare complication of tuberculous meningitis and should be considered when a TBM patient develops spinal cord symptoms.
Concurrent opportunistic infections and comorbidities in patients with cryptococcal meningitis (N=57) Opportunistic infections n % Pulmonary tuberculosis 32 56 Oropharyngeal candidiasis 57 100 Seborrhoeic dermatitis 12 21 Oral hairy leukoplakia 8 14 Tuberculous meningitis 10 23
Serum and cerebrospinal fluid neuron-specific enolase for diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis.
The most common sites of tuberculous meningitis are the sylvian fissure, the chiasmatic cistern, and the perimesencephalic cistern.
Patients with tuberculous meningitis were excluded, as they received an intensified ATT with higher penetration in cerebrospinal fluid [12].
This case is presented to remind us that tuberculous meningitis should be included in the differential diagnosis of central nervous system pathologies in patients diagnosed with SLE.