endometritis

(redirected from tuberculous endometritis)
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Related to tuberculous endometritis: purulent endometritis

endometritis

 [en″do-me-tri´tis]
inflammation of the endometrium.
puerperal endometritis endometritis following childbirth.
syncytial endometritis a benign tumorlike lesion with infiltration of the uterine wall by large syncytial trophoblastic cells.
tuberculous endometritis inflammation of the endometrium, usually also involving the fallopian tubes, due to infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with the presence of tubercles.

en·do·me·tri·tis

(en'dō-mē-trī'tis),
Inflammation of the endometrium.
[endometrium + -itis, inflammation]

endometritis

/en·do·me·tri·tis/ (-me-tri´tis) inflammation of the endometrium.
puerperal endometritis  that following childbirth.
syncytial endometritis  a benign tumor-like lesion with infiltration of the uterine wall by large syncytial trophoblastic cells.
tuberculous endometritis  inflammation of the endometrium, usually also involving the uterine tubes, due to infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with the presence of tubercles.

endometritis

[en′dōmitrī′tis]
Etymology: Gk, endon, within, + metra, womb, itis, inflammation
an inflammatory condition of the endometrium or decidua, with extension into the myometrium and parametrial tissues. It is usually caused by bacterial infection, commonly by gonococci or hemolytic streptococci. The condition is characterized by fever, abdominal pain, tachycardia, malodorous discharge, tenderness, and enlargement of the uterus. It occurs most frequently after childbirth or abortion and is associated with the use of an intrauterine contraceptive device. It can also be the result of caesarean delivery. Diagnosis may be made by physical examination, history, laboratory analysis revealing an elevated white blood cell count, ultrasound, and bacteriological identification of the pathogen. Treatment includes antibiotics, rest, analgesia, adequate fluid intake, and, if necessary, surgical drainage of a suppurating abscess, hysterectomy, or salpingo-oophorectomy. Endometritis may be mild and self-limited, chronic or acute, and unilateral or bilateral. It may cause sterility if scar formation occludes the passage of the fallopian tubes. Septic abortion and puerperal fever are forms of endometritis that caused many deaths before asepsis and antibiotics became commonly available. A kind of endometritis is decidual endometritis. See also pelvic inflammatory disease.

endometritis

Gynecology Inflammation of the endometrium Etiology Complication of first TM abortion, IUD Clinical Pelvic or lower abdominal pain, rank, funky discharge if infected Management Antibiotics

en·do·me·tri·tis

(en'dō-mē-trī'tis)
Inflammation of the endometrium.
[endometrium + -itis, inflammation]

endometritis

Inflammation of the ENDOMETRIUM, the inner lining of the womb (uterus). This is the result of infection, the most severe form being puerperal endometritis (puerperal sepsis) which sometimes occurs following childbirth. This was once a common cause of death after delivery.

Endometritis

Inflammation of the endometrium or mucous membrane of the uterus.
Mentioned in: Warts

endometritis

inflammation of the endometrium. See also metritis.

hyperplastic endometritis
puerperal endometritis
endometritis following parturition.
purulent endometritis
characterized by a small accumulation of pus in the uterus and a discharge, which may be intermittent, of thick pus from the vulva.
syncytial endometritis
a benign tumor-like lesion with infiltration of the uterine wall by large syncytial trophoblastic cells.
tuberculous endometritis
inflammation of the endometrium, usually also involving the uterine tubes, due to infection by Mycobacterium bovis, with the presence of tubercles.