tryptamine


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Related to tryptamine: tryptophan, DMT, dimethyltryptamine

tryptamine

 [trip´tah-mēn]
a chemical product of the decarboxylation of tryptophan, causing vasoconstriction by the release of norepinephrine at postganglionic nerve endings.

trypt·a·mine

(trip'tă-mēn, -min),
A decarboxylation product of l-tryptophan that occurs in plants and certain foods (for example, cheese). It raises the blood pressure through vasoconstrictor action, by the release of norepinephrine at postganglionic sympathetic nerve endings, and is believed to be one of the agents responsible for hypertensive episodes after therapy with monoamine oxidase inhibitors (for example, pargyline hydrochloride).

tryptamine

/tryp·ta·mine/ (trip´tah-mēn) a product of the decarboxylation of tryptophan, occurring in plants and certain foods such as cheese; it raises blood pressure via vasoconstriction by causing the release of norepinephrine at postganglionic nerve endings.

tryptamine

(trĭp′tə-mēn′)
n.
1. A crystalline substance, C10H12N2, that is formed in plant and animal tissues from tryptophan and is an intermediate in various metabolic processes.
2. Any of various naturally occurring or synthetic derivatives of this compound, many of which have psychoactive properties.

tryp·ta·mine

(trip'tă-mēn, -min)
A decarboxylation product of l-tryptophan that occurs in plants and certain foods. It raises the blood pressure through vasoconstrictor action, by the release of norepinephrine at postganglionic sympathetic nerve endings, and is believed to be one of the agents responsible for hypertensive episodes after therapy with monoamine oxidase inhibitors.
References in periodicals archive ?
The primary active components of the toad venom are the tryptamine alkaloids 5-MeO-DMT and 5-HO-DMT (bufotenin).
The detection of N-methyl transferase, an enzyme capable of converting naturally-occurring tryptamine to DMT in human brain was first reported in 1972 (Saavedra, 1972).
Natural tryptamine is found in many psychedelic substances including psilocybin mushrooms, typically known as aACAymagic mushrooms' and dimethyltryptamine, usually abbreviated to DMT.
Nutmeg and its active component, myristicin, produce central monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibition as evidenced by the ability to lower the convulsive dose of IV tryptamine in mice and to increase brain 5-hydroxytryptamine concentra-fions.
The first phase is attributed to the release of histamine, 5-hydroxy tryptamine (serotonin) and kinin while the second phase is related to the release of prostaglandins.
The applications of non-classical bioisosterism have also been reported in a number of areas of pharmacology including adrenergic and anti adrenergic drugs [28, 30-31] , several NSAID classes like aryl acetic acid derivatives [32], cetroplac, tolmetin, indomethacin, etodolac [5], antibacterial drugs [33] , antidepressant of morpholine class [34] , neuropeptide substance P antagonists (NK1 antagonists) [35], cholinergic (muscarinic type) agonists [36], GABA modulators like muscimol, thiomuscimol, isomuscimol as agonists [37-38], peptidomimetics [39], diuretics like ethacrinic acid [5] and 5-hyderoxy tryptamine (5-HT1A;1D) agonists like naratryptan and sumatryptan for acute attack of migraine [40].
cabrerana are rich in the tryptamine hallucinogen N, N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT) (dos Santos 2011a; dos Santos 2011b; Luna 2011; Schultes & Raffauf 2004; Riba 2003; Ott 1994; Schultes & Hofmann 1992; Schultes 1986).
Reactions can be triggered by naturally occurring ingredients in beer and wine, including barley, ethanol, grapes, histamine, hops, malt, oats, tryptamine, tyramine, wheat, and yeast.
They describe four different neurochemical models: the filter model, the beta-carboline and tryptamine model, the DMT model, and the ketamine model.
A relatively higher concentration of sucrose was also reported to be favorable for rosmarinic acid production in Anchusa officinalis cell culture (De-Eknambul & Ellis 1985), the ajmalicine, serpentine, and tryptamine in Catharanthus roseus cell cultures (Merillon et al.
Effects of tryptamine on growth, ultrastructure, and oxidative stress of cyanobacteria and microalgae cultures.