tryptamine


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Related to tryptamine: tryptophan, DMT, dimethyltryptamine

tryptamine

 [trip´tah-mēn]
a chemical product of the decarboxylation of tryptophan, causing vasoconstriction by the release of norepinephrine at postganglionic nerve endings.

trypt·a·mine

(trip'tă-mēn, -min),
A decarboxylation product of l-tryptophan that occurs in plants and certain foods (for example, cheese). It raises the blood pressure through vasoconstrictor action, by the release of norepinephrine at postganglionic sympathetic nerve endings, and is believed to be one of the agents responsible for hypertensive episodes after therapy with monoamine oxidase inhibitors (for example, pargyline hydrochloride).

tryptamine

/tryp·ta·mine/ (trip´tah-mēn) a product of the decarboxylation of tryptophan, occurring in plants and certain foods such as cheese; it raises blood pressure via vasoconstriction by causing the release of norepinephrine at postganglionic nerve endings.

tryptamine

(trĭp′tə-mēn′)
n.
1. A crystalline substance, C10H12N2, that is formed in plant and animal tissues from tryptophan and is an intermediate in various metabolic processes.
2. Any of various naturally occurring or synthetic derivatives of this compound, many of which have psychoactive properties.

tryp·ta·mine

(trip'tă-mēn, -min)
A decarboxylation product of l-tryptophan that occurs in plants and certain foods. It raises the blood pressure through vasoconstrictor action, by the release of norepinephrine at postganglionic sympathetic nerve endings, and is believed to be one of the agents responsible for hypertensive episodes after therapy with monoamine oxidase inhibitors.
References in periodicals archive ?
Natural tryptamine is found in many psychedelic substances including psilocybin mushrooms, typically known as aACAymagic mushrooms' and dimethyltryptamine, usually abbreviated to DMT.
of tryptamines for use in quantitative mass spec-based testing applications such as forensic analysis, clinical toxicology, urine drug testing, or pharmaceutical research.
2006) suggested that this tryptamine may have a synthetic origin.
This involves development of numerous analytical methods for many compounds, including nutritional supplements, designer amphetamines, tryptamines, psilocybin, suspected agents in sexual assault cases, and other psychoactive compounds.
However, other pathways that involve the production of indole-3-pyruvic acid and tryptamine may also be active.
Using lasers to initiate and probe the folding process, a group, including chemist Timothy Zwier, precisely has determined the energies needed to twist tryptamine, a molecule with several flexible "hinges" that bear a close resemblance to an amino acid, the basis of proteins.
Tryptamine as an Anti-Insect Compound in Higher Plants.
The trace amines, which include tyramine, beta-phenylethylamine (beta-PEA), tryptamine, and octopamine, continued to draw some attention.
Gaddum JH, Picarelli ZP: Two kinds of tryptamine receptor.
Sahelian also note the presence of tryptamine, a hallucinogenic compound, in melatonin, while Reiter mentions that smoking marijuana dramatically stimulates melatonin production in the body.
An important gene, strictosidine synthase (STR) that catalyzes the condensation of tryptamine with secologanin to form strictosidine, an important precursor of CPT, has not yet been unraveled in the fungi.