trophoblast


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trophoblast

 [trof´o-blast]
the peripheral cells of the blastocyst, which attach the zygote (fertilized ovum) to the uterine wall and become the placenta and the membranes that nourish and protect the developing organism. The inner cellular layer is the cytotrophoblast and the outer layer is the syntrophoblast.

troph·o·blast

(trof'ō-blast, trō'fō-blast),
The mesectodermal cell layer covering the blastocyst that erodes the uterine mucosa and through which the embryo receives nourishment from the mother; the cells do not enter into the formation of the embryo itself but contribute to formation of the placenta. The trophoblast develops processes that later receive a core of vascular mesoderm and are then known as the chorionic villi; the trophoblast soon becomes two layered, differentiating into the syncytiotrophoblast, an outer layer consisting of a multinucleated protoplasmic mass (syncytium), and the cytotrophoblast, the inner layer next to the mesoderm in which the cells retain their membranes.
Synonym(s): chorionic ectoderm
[tropho- + G. blastos, germ]

trophoblast

/tro·pho·blast/ (tro´fo-blast) the peripheral cells of the blastocyst, which attach the blastocyst to the uterine wall and become the placenta and the membranes that nourish and protect the developing organism.trophoblas´tic

trophoblast

(trō′fə-blăst′)
n.
The outermost layer of cells of the mammalian blastocyst that attaches the fertilized ovum to the uterine wall and serves as a nutritive pathway for the embryo.

tro′pho·blas′tic adj.

trophoblast

[trof′əblast′]
Etymology: Gk, trophe + blastos, germ
the outermost layer of tissue that forms the wall of the blastocyst of placental mammals in the early stages of embryonic development. It functions in the implantation of the blastocyst in the uterine wall and in supplying nutrients to the embryo. At implantation the cells differentiate into two layers: the inner cytotrophoblast, which forms the chorion, and the syncytiotrophoblast, which develops into the outer layer of the placenta. Also called trophectoderm. trophoblastic, adj.

troph·o·blast

(trō'fō-blast)
The mesectodermal cell layer covering the blastocyst, which erodes the uterine mucosa and through which the embryo receives nourishment from the mother; the cells do not enter into the formation of the embryo itself, but contribute to the formation of the placenta. The trophoblast develops processes that later receive a core of vascular mesoderm and are then known as the chorionic villi; the trophoblast soon becomes two-layered, differentiating into the syncytiotrophoblast, an outer layer consisting of a multinucleated protoplasmic mass (syncytium), and the cytotrophoblast, the inner layer next to the mesoderm in which the cells retain their membranes.
[tropho- + G. blastos, germ]

trophoblast

The outer layer of the BLASTOCYST.

trophoblast

the outermost layer of cells surrounding the BLASTOCYST, consisting of embryonic epithelium, which subsequently encloses all the embryonic structures of the developing mammal and forms the outer layer of the CHORION and the embryonic side of the placenta.

Trophoblast

The tissues that surround an embryo and attach it to the uterus.
Mentioned in: Choriocarcinoma

troph·o·blast

(trō'fō-blast)
Mesectodermal cell layer covering the blastocyst that erodes uterine mucosa and through which embryo receives nourishment from mother.
[tropho- + G. blastos, germ]

trophoblast

the peripheral cells of the blastocyst, which attach the fertilized ovum to the uterine wall and contribute to the placenta and the membranes that nourish and protect the developing organism. The inner cellular layer is the cytotrophoblast and the outer layer is the syntrophoblast.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additionally, we propose immunohistochemical studies to identify and evaluate differences in expression of TF and TM, as well as in vitro studies of trophoblast under hypoxic conditions to evaluate expression at mRNA and protein levels.
Simvastatin reduces cell viability of osteosarcoma and trophoblast cells
Macrophage-induced apoptosis limits endovascular trophoblast invasion in the uterine wall of preeclamptic women.
Local attenuation of trophoblast, especially overlying peripheralised and dilated capillaries, creates vasculosyncytial membranes (Benirschke and Kaufmann, 2000) and reduces effective diffusion distances (harmonic mean about 4 [micro]m).
It is suggested that MHC-I expression in early pregnancy is caused by faulty genome reprogramming, either by inheritance from the somatic donor cell, by persistent or continuous expression since embryo reconstruction, or by gene activation of MHC-I loci in the trophoblast as development progresses.
Attachment of the embryo to the uterus involves the direct interaction of the trophoblast with the uterine epithelium.
If the trophoblast is allowed to invade too far into the womb, it can trigger cancer of the placenta in the mother.
It is formed when the chorion, consisting of trophoblast tissue and blood vessel-containing mesoderm, fuses with the uterine wall.
Dr Fiona Lyall, a miscarriage expert at Yorkhill Hospital, has found that, during the normal pregnancy, cells from the placenta, called trophoblast increase the blood supply to the embryo and allow it to grow.
In early pregnancy, APL combines with autoantigens on the trophoblast cells of the maternal-fetal interface.
he other two types of stem cell in the blastocyst are the extra-embryonic trophoblast stem cells (TSCs), which will form the placenta; and primitive endoderm stem cells that will form the so-called yolk sac, ensuring that the fetus's organs develop properly and providing essential nutrients.