trivial name


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triv·i·al name

(triv'ē-ăl nām),
A name of a chemical, no part of which is necessarily used in a systematic sense; that is, it gives little or no indication as to chemical structure. Such names are common for drugs, hormones, proteins, and other biologicals, and are used by the general public. They may not be officially sanctioned, in contrast to nonproprietary names, but may be adopted as official nonproprietary names as a result of widespread usage. Examples are water, aspirin, chlorophyll, heme, methotrexate, folic acid, caffeine, thyroxine, epinephrine, barbital, etc.; also common abbreviations for chemically defined substances, such as ACTH, MSH, BAL, DDT, which are spoken as such and not in terms of the words they represent. The distinction between trivial and semitrivial names is seldom made; thus tetrahydrofolate, methylglycine, glucosamine, etc., are often termed trivial even though each contains a systematic part that is used in the correct systematic sense (tetrahydro for four hydrogen atoms, methyl for a -CH3 group, amine for -NH2 in the above examples). Trivial names are often assigned arbitrarily to chemical compounds, especially from natural sources, before the chemical structures, hence systematic names can be assigned. Additionally, they afford useful shortenings of long systematic names even when these can be stated (although most such shortenings turn out to be semisystematic, because they incorporate some portion of the systematic name).

trivial name

n.
2. Chemistry A common, historic, or convenient name for a substance, derived often from the source in which the substance was discovered, but unsystematic and not used in modern official nomenclature, as sucrose for β-D-fructofuranosyl-α-D-glucopyranoside.

trivial name

[triv′ē·əl]
a chemical name that is not derived from a systematic nomenclature system such as the IUPAC nomenclature system. The name may or may not indicate its relationship to molecular structure and to other chemicals. The name may be accepted as an official nonproprietary designation because of common usage. Examples include caffeine, folic acid, and aspirin.
A popular, working, non-standard or common name for a thing or process, which has been assigned a formal name by a body of experts or a name based on ‘official’ rules delineated by nomenclature committees of internationally sanctioned bodies—e.g., American Psychiatric Association, Enzyme Commission, the International System, Terminologia Anatomica, etc.

trivial name

A popular, working, or common name for a thing or process that has a formal name. See CD, DSM-IV, EC, SI.
Trivial name
Disease–eg, Lou Gehrig's disease for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis
Molecule–eg, Teflon for polytetrafluoroethylene
Organ–eg, anterior pituitary for adenohypophysis
Structure–eg, vocal cord for vocal fold–plica vocalis, or fallopian tube for tuba uterina, which is not standard nomenclature or based on 'official' rules delineated by international agencies or organizations–eg, American Psychiatric Association, Enzyme Commission, the International System, Terminologia Anatomica, etc

triv·i·al name

(triv'ē-ăl nām)
A name of a chemical, no part of which is necessarily used in a systematic sense; i.e., it gives little or no indication as to chemical structure. Such names are commonly used for drugs, hormones, proteins, and other biologicals, and by the general public (e.g., water, aspirin [in the United States], chlorophyll, heme, methotrexate, folic acid, caffeine, thyroxine, epinephrine, barbital); also common abbreviations for chemically defined substances, which are spoken as such and not in terms of the words they represent. Trivial names often are assigned arbitrarily to chemical compounds, especially those from natural sources, before the chemical structures are known.

trivial name

the specific or subspecific name in CLASSIFICATION.

triv·i·al name

(triv'ē-ăl nām)
A name of a chemical, no part of which is necessarily used in a systematic sense; i.e., it gives little or no indication as to chemical structure. Such names are common for drugs, hormones, proteins, and other biologicals, and are used by the general public. They may not be officially sanctioned, in contrast to nonproprietary names, but may be adopted as official nonproprietary names as a result of widespread usage.