triprolidine


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triprolidine

 [tri-pro´lĭ-dēn]
an antihistamine with sedative and anticholinergic effects; used as the hydrochloride salt in the treatment of nasal, eye, and skin manifestations of allergic reactions, including allergic rhinitis, conjunctivitis, and itching, and also as an ingredient in some cough and cold preparations, administered orally.

triprolidine

/tri·pro·li·dine/ (tri-pro´lĭ-dēn) an antihistamine with anticholinergic and sedative effects, used as the hydrochloride salt.

triprolidine

[trī·prol′idēn]
an antihistamine.
indications It is prescribed in the treatment of hypersensitivity reactions, including rhinitis, skin rash, and pruritus.
contraindications Asthma or known hypersensitivity to this drug prohibits its use. It is not given to newborns or lactating mothers. Adverse reactions may occur in elderly patients.

triprolidine

An antihistamine drug used to treat allergy and to relieve the symptoms of colds. A brand name of a preparation combined with PSEUDOEPHEDRINE is Sudafed Plus.

triprolidine

used as an antihistamine.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The older drugs (called first-generation antihistamines), which include chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton), diphenhydramine (Benadryl), hydroxyzine (Hyzine) and triprolidine (Zymine), cause drowsiness and increase the risk of vehicle and occupational injuries.
Examples of unlicensed use of medicines Name of medicine Unlicensed use Triprolidine Not licensed for children below 2 years, prescribed for child <3 months Piroxicam Not licensed for children <6 years, prescribed for children <5 months Licensed for use only in children with chronic juvenile arthritis, used as antipyretic in children Paracetamol Not licensed for children <6 years, prescribed for (as tablet) children <3 years Salbutamol Unlicensed for children <2 years, prescribed for infants of 8 months Co-trimoxazole Not licensed for children <12 years, prescribed (as tablet) for children <4 years Ciprofloxacin Not licensed for children <5 years, prescribed for child 2.
Examples of common ingredients in cough and cold medications, by class of medication Class Examples Antihistamine Acrivastine, brompheniramine, carbinoxamine, (first generation) chlorpheniramine, cyproheptadine, diphenhydramine, doxylamine, triprolidine Antipyretic Acetaminophen, ibuprofen and analgesic Cough suppressant Benzonatate, codeine, dextromethorphan, (antitussive) hydrocodone Expectorant Guaifenesin Nasal decongestant Ephedrine, phenylephrine, phenylpropanolamine, pseudoephedrine
Loratadine is among the first of a new generation of antihistamines that is designed to be less sedating at recommended dos ages than such antihistamines as diphenhydraminc HCL (used in Benadryl) or triprolidine (Actifed).
5 [degrees] C Cefuroxime possible failure to (1 day), poor Paracetamol thrive; no recent appetite, vomiting, Chloropheniramine travel inflamed oropharynx Pseudoephedrine - Triprolidine (No antiviral medications) 4-year-old girl, Fever 38.
SOME remedies include triprolidine, diphenhydramine or promethazine, which help unblock your nose and stop you sneezing, although not all scientists agree on whether they work.
The first-generation, or "classic," antihistamines are chlorpheniramine, diphenhydramine, hydroxyzine, and triprolidine.
NEW YORK--From the 1982 approval of triprolidine hydrochloride (the antihistamine used in Actifed capsules and syrup) for over-the-counter sale; to the 1995 clearance of ranitidine in the acid reducer Zantac 75, to scores of ingredients found in a multitude of other products, the movement of medications from prescription to O-T-C status has had a major impact on the health care system in the United States.
A double-blind crossover trial of pseudoephedrine and triprolidine, alone and in combination, for the treatment of allergenic rhinitis.
Ingredients include brompheniramine, chlorpheniramine and triprolidine.
Diclofenac sodium (NSAID), diphenhydramine, paracetamol caffeine, paracetamol plus triprolidine (irrational combinations) have all been used by a large number of patients as selfmedications.