trematode


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Related to trematode: cestode

fluke

 [flo̳k]
an organism of the class trematoda, characterized by a body that is usually flat and often leaflike; flukes can infect the blood, liver, intestines, and lungs. Called also trematode.

Flukes are not common in the United States but are a serious problem in many Asian, tropical, and subtropical countries. The Chinese liver fluke, Clonorchis sinensis, enters the body in raw or improperly cooked fish and may cause enlargement of the liver, jaundice, anemia, and weakness. Another liver fluke, Fasciola hepatica, is occasionally found in humans; it causes obstruction of the bile ducts and enlargement of the liver. Blood flukes such as Schistosoma penetrate the skin, make their way to the blood and travel to various parts of the body (see also schistosomiasis).

Treatment varies according to the type of fluke involved and requires careful medical supervision. Proper cooking of fish provides protection against liver fluke infection. Since snails are carriers of flukes, their destruction, usually by poison, is an effective preventive measure in areas where fluke infection is a problem.

trem·a·tode

, trematoid (trem'ă-tōd, trem'ă-toyd),
1. Common name for a fluke of the class Trematoda.
2. Relating to a fluke of the class Trematoda.

trematode

/trem·a·tode/ (trem´ah-tōd) an individual of the class Trematoda.

trematode

(trĕm′ə-tōd′)
n.
Any of numerous flatworms of the class Trematoda, including both external and internal parasites of animal hosts, that have a thick outer cuticle and one or more suckers or hooks for attaching to host tissue.

trem′a·tode′ adj.

trematode

[trem′ətōd]
Etymology: Gk, trematodes, pierced
any species of flatworm of the class Trematoda, some of which are parasitic to humans, infecting the liver, the lungs, and the intestines. Kinds of trematodes include the organisms causing clonorchiasis, fascioliasis, paragonimiasis, schistosomiasis. See also fluke.

trem·a·tode

, trematoid (trem'ă-tōd, -toyd)
1. Common name for a fluke of the class Trematoda.
2. Relating to a fluke of the class Trematoda.

trematode

Any of the large number of parasitic flatworms, of the class Trematoda , that are equipped with suckers by which they attach themselves to host tissue. This class includes the Schistosome species and the liver flukes.

trematode

any parasitic flatworm of the class Trematoda, including the FLUKES.

Trematode

Parasitic flatworms or another name for fluke, taken from a Greek word that means having holes.

trem·a·tode

, trematoid (trem'ă-tōd, -toyd)
Common name for a fluke of the class Trematoda.

trematode

parasitic worm; member of the class Trematoda. There are three subclasses, Monogenea, containing parasites of fish, amphibians and mammals, Digenea, containing the flukes of domestic animals, called also digenetic trematodes. These cause parasitic disease of most systems, including the blood, eye, liver, reproductive tract, respiratory system, skin and urinary system. The third subclass is the Aspidogastrea, parasitic in molluscs, fish and reptiles.

Patient discussion about trematode

Q. I heard and experienced that the natural medicine is better than modern. I heard and experienced that the natural medicine is better than modern. When I came through a book I read about kombucha, which is not explained in it. What is kombucha?

A. BE CAREFUL;what you read is not always true,there have been results with natural meds for minor medical problems,BUT you also have to no that all meds natural/modern do not work on all people.some off these cures are more hype than anything else.If these natural meds really cured people we would all be healthy--using them with modern meds is your best bet when you have a severe med problem,always check with your DR.NO NOT TRY TO SELF DIAGNOSE,and put somthing in you bodyif you are work,sometimes ther is no turning back---mrfoot56--peace

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References in periodicals archive ?
However, the larval trematodes that infect molluscs in these temporary artificial wetlands were little studied (Fernandez, Hamann, & Ostrowski de Nunez, 2013, 2014).
Host density and competency determine the effects of host diversity on trematode parasite infection.
All 42 granuloma samples were subjected to assays (Power SYBR Green PCR Master Mix; Applied Biosystems, Warrington, UK) targeting rDNA spanning the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 2 sequence of the trematode with custom-designed primers.
Social organization in a flatworm: trematode parasites form soldier and reproductive castes.
Because the discovery of this trematode had health implications for the remaining birds in the collection and dissemination of the parasite beyond the incident collection was undesirable, surveillance was initiated for the birds in the exhibit (Tropic 1) where the bird of the index case had hatched.
It is likely that both bluegill and redbreast sunfish co-occur in areas where physid snails, first intermediate host in the life cycle of this trematode, are actively shedding the parasite.
Among the parasites reported in mullets (Mugil platanus), Ascocotyle (Phagicola) Ransom, 1920 (Digenea: Heterophyidae) trematode is very common and can cause disease in human by consumption of parasitized raw seafood [5-7].
Keywords: Nematopsis Northern Arabian Sea Ostrea Saccostrea Crassostrea Trematode parasite.