treatment-emergent adverse event


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treatment-emergent adverse event

An event that first appears during treatment, which was absent before or which worsens relative to the pre-treatment state.
References in periodicals archive ?
The most frequently reported treatment-emergent adverse events were application-site reaction and were more likely associated with the tazarotene component.
Seven serious treatment-emergent adverse events were reported in the extension study, and none of these was considered to be treatment-related.
The most common any-grade treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) reported in the lenvatinib plus everolimus group were diarrhea, decreased appetite and fatigue.
The most common treatment-emergent adverse events included dizziness in 13% of subjects, anxiety in 7%, and other mood disturbances in 6%.
A combined safety summary showed that treatment-emergent adverse events occurred in 42.
The overall number of non-serious treatment-emergent adverse events was similar.
Treatment-emergent adverse events were collected from 1913 women aged 22-83 in 4 double-blind, 12-week, placebo-controlled SUI studies and from 2161 women aged 20-87 in 4 open-label, long-term SUI studies.
The most common treatment-emergent adverse events of any grade regardless of relationship occurring in more than 30 percent of patients were nausea (62 percent), peripheral sensory neuropathy (62 percent), diarrhea (58 percent), fatigue (54 percent) and alopecia (46 percent).
The incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events was similar with Taltz compared with placebo.
In COAST-V, the incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events was similar with Taltz compared with placebo.
The incidence of ocular treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) was similar between the four weekly extension and two weekly extension groups (15.
In examining safety data from the pooled trials, Lydie Hazan, MD, of Axis Clinical Trials and her collaborators found that for pediatric patients most treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) were skin and subcutaneous tissue related.