traumatogenic

traumatogenic (trô´mətōjen´ik),

adj capable of producing a wound or injury.
traumatogenic occlusion,
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For instance, even though we know about the depth of racism in our history and its profoundly traumatogenic potential (though this gets little or no attention in formal training
The Bundeswehr Central Hospital is a specialized hospital with traumatogenic emergency care, Center for Interdisciplinary Vascular Medicine, cardiac surgery, oncology center and center head.
New knowledge in the sphere of basic research and in the modern field in question have formed preconditions and substantial possibilities of technique in case of conventional orthopaedic surgical operations such as correction of uneven length and deformations of limbs, osteosynthesis, but particularly in possibilities of replacements of worn-out degenerative joints either on the developing, inflammatory, traumatogenic, metabolic grounds or in the postoperative states (Kl'oc, 2009).
2003), (Taylor & Stoianovici, 2003) and high potentials in the area of conventional orthopaedic surgical operations as for instance corrections of uneven length and deformations of limbs, osteosynthesis, but particularly in possibilities of replacements of worn-out degenerative joints either on the developing, inflammatory, traumatogenic, metabolic grounds or in the postoperative states (Biyikli & Modest, 1987).
Veterans of WWII, like combat veterans from wars before and since, suffer from a variety of traumatogenic disorders and co-morbid conditions.
European memory requires shared transmission of the meanings of past events, or at least their articulation, especially in the case of traumatogenic events.
However, trauma as a cultural process is not a state of group existence, nor can it be brought down to individual experiences; neither is it limited to the experience of those who directly participated in the traumatogenic event, but consists in the process of constructing cultural memory.
Assuming that collective trauma is a concept referring to very diverse traumatogenic events, one may--albeit with reserve--agree with the statement that a given situation may be traumatogenic in one sociocultural context and non-traumatogenic in another (Smelser 2004:36)--at least in regard to the initiation of the reflexive process of memory.
Susan Clancy ignited a firestorm of criticism with the publication of her book The Trauma Myth (2009), a research-based polemic repudiating the traumatogenic theory--the dominant theory in the CSA area for nearly 40 years.
Clancy (2009) contended that although the traumatogenic theory has done much to heighten society's awareness of CSA, it has done little for victims--in part because it does not accurately characterize the nature of most victims' abuse experiences or the processes by which CSA produces adverse outcomes in adulthood:
The traumatogenic theory underscored the seriousness of CSA and its long-term consequences, which had, hitherto, been largely socially invisible.
The potentially traumatogenic consequences of affects can lead to an overload of the ego.