transubstantiation


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Related to transubstantiation: consubstantiation

transubstantiation

[trans′əbstan′chē·ā′shən]
the replacement or substitution of one kind of tissue for another.

transubstantiation

(trăn″sŭb-stăn″shē-ā′shŭn) [″ + substantia, substance]
The process of replacing one tissue for another.

transubstantiation (tranˈ·sb·stanˈ·shē·āˑ·shn),

n 1., a substitution of one tissue type with another.
2., in Catholic Christianity, the doctrine that the substances of the bread and wine shared in the Eucharist (Holy Communion) are miraculously transformed into the body and blood of Christ.
References in periodicals archive ?
50) Lollard attacks on the doctrine of transubstantiation aimed to denigrate the Host's sacred status.
Bevington emphasizes that 'the acceptance of dramatic miracle in the Sacrament play is therefore synonymous with the acceptance of the doctrine of transubstantiation, not abstractly but vividly and immediately', and Emmerson suggests an analogue between Chester's Antichrist and the Croxton Play, as both rely on 'miraculous use of divine power to confront doubt' about the real presence.
The Eucharistizing action transubstantiation describes is not the scaffolding but is itself the building that encloses all the rest.
Jack Juggler is much wittier than such Edwardian morality plays, but its serious subtext is hinted at through the author's decision to center its action on a proverb--"A man cannot be in two places at once"--which was central to Reformed critiques of the doctrine of transubstantiation.
Parker's intention was to sustain AElfric's text was an evidence of the Anglo-Saxon belief in a spiritual communion and not a real blood and flesh one, which would imply a transubstantiation of wine and bread.
Transubstantiation was re-emphasized by the Council of Trent in the 16th century, but the council said it was doing so without prejudice to the theology of the East.
In his close reading of the confession, Reardon describes Marpeck's sacramental theology as a nuanced via media between Catholic theories of transubstantiation and Reformed memorialism.
As per the church, the song's title derives from the words "hocus pocus", the phrase which was a Puritan parody of the Latin "hoc est enim corpus meum" or "this is my body" used by Catholic priests to accompany the transubstantiation during mass.
As Donna De Salvo points out in her catalogue essay, Weiner's emphasis on an object's use value as well as its physical characteristics and given contexts to create meaningful perplexity differs dramatically from the Duchampian aesthetic of transubstantiation through recontextualization.
The second, and much shorter part, is a glossary of terms and events which could be longer: there are no definitions, for example, for the Virgin Birth, justification by faith, Assumption, transubstantiation and so on.
In Sacred Players, Heather Hill-Vasquez argues with reference to the Chester plays' 1562 Banns that the sixteenth century's preservation of Middle English religious drama, marshalled originally by a Catholic ecclesia for the affirmation of Catholic beliefs and sacramental practices such as Eucharistic transubstantiation, marks a reworking of medieval religious drama to suit Protestant sensibilities.
Evans suspects that his late-in-life opposition to the doctrine of transubstantiation was for polemical reasons made more extreme, accordingly.