transpulmonary pressure


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Related to transpulmonary pressure: alveolar pressure, intrapleural pressure

trans·pul·mo·nar·y pres·sure

the difference between the pressure of the respired gas at the mouth and the pleural pressure around the lungs, measured when the airway is open; thus, it includes not only the transmural pressure of the lung but also any drop in pressure along the tracheobronchial tree during flow.

transpulmonary pressure

[-pul′məner′ē]
the difference between intraalveolar and intrapleural pressure, or the pressure acting across the lung from the pleural space to the alveoli.

transpulmonary pressure

Physiology The difference between airway pressure and pleural pressure–PAW—PPL, a clinically important respiratory measure in ICU Pts; it is also derived by multiplying the airway pressure by the ratio of lung parenchyma elastance and total lung elastance; for a given PAW, rise of the PPL has effects on hemodynamics, lung distention and recruitment, and interstitial lung fluid–pulmonary edema

trans·pul·mo·nar·y pres·sure

(trans-pul'mŏ-nar-ē presh'ŭr)
The pressure difference across the lungs; the difference between the pressure at the airway opening and the pressure on the visceral pleural surface (i.e., pressure at the airway opening - pleural pressure).
References in periodicals archive ?
The mouth pressure can then be substituted in the calculation for transpulmonary pressure as follows: Expiratory Resistance ([R.
Targeting transpulmonary pressure to prevent ventilator induced lung injury.
The importance of intrapleural pressure to the determination of transpulmonary pressure and therefore actual lung stretch has been recently emphasized in work by Talmor and colleagues (NEJM 2008), who set PEEP in ARDS effectively using transpulmonary pressure, determined as the difference between airway and esophageal balloon ("pleural") pressures.
Generation of transpulmonary pressure sufficient to exceed airway opening pressure, elimination of lung compression by the heart, non-gravitational distribution of perfusion and attenuation of lung injury have been proposed as mechanisms for the effect of prone positioning (8-12).