transplant

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transplant

 
1. (trans´plant) an organ or tissue taken from the body and grafted into another area of the same individual or another individual.
2. (trans-plant´) to transfer tissue from one part to another or from one individual to another. See also transplantation.

trans·plant

(trans'plant),
1. To transfer from one part to another, as in grafting and transplantation.
See also: graft.
2. The tissue or organ in grafting and transplantation.
See also: graft.
[trans- + L. planto, to plant]

transplant

/trans·plant/ (trans´plant)
1. graft: an organ or tissue taken from the body for grafting into another area of the same body or into another individual.
2. the process of removing and grafting such an organ or tissue.

transplant

/trans·plant/ (trans-plant´) to transfer tissue from one part to another.

transplant

(trăns-plănt′)
v. trans·planted, trans·planting, trans·plants
v.tr.
1. To uproot and replant (a growing plant).
2. Medicine
a. To transfer (tissue, a body structure, or an organ) from one body to another body or from one part of the body to another part.
b. To transfer (tissue, a body structure, or an organ) from an animal or cadaver to a person.
v.intr.
To be capable of being transplanted: plants that transplant well.
n. (trăns′plănt′)
Something that is transplanted, especially:
a. A plant that has been uprooted and replanted in another place.
b. Medicine An organ, body part, or other tissue that has been transplanted, as from one person to another.

trans·plant′a·ble adj.
trans′plan·ta′tion n.
trans·plant′er n.

transplant

[trans′plant, transplant′]
Etymology: L, transplantare
1 v, to transfer an organ or tissue from one person to another or from one body part to another to replace a diseased structure, restore function, or change appearance. Skin and kidneys are the most frequently transplanted structures. Others include cartilage, bone, bone marrow, corneal tissue, parts of blood vessels and tendons, hearts, lungs, and livers. Preferred donors are identical twins or people having the same blood type and immunological characteristics. Success of the transplant depends on overcoming the rejection of the donor tissue by the recipient's immune system. With the patient under local or general anesthesia, the recipient site is prepared, and the donor structure is grafted in place. Its oxygenation and blood supply are preserved during the procedure until the circulation can be restored at the new site. After surgery circulation in the area is observed for signs of impairment. Antirejection drugs are given to suppress the production of antibodies to the foreign tissue proteins. Signs of rejection reaction include fever, pain, and loss of function, usually occurring in the first 4 to 10 days after transplantation. An abscess may form if the reaction is not subdued promptly. The grafted structure may require several weeks to become established. Late rejection may occur several months or even 1 year later.
2 n, any tissue or organ that is transplanted.
3 adj, pertaining to a tissue or organ that is transplanted, a recipient of a donated tissue or organ, or a phenomenon associated with the procedure. Also called graft, transplantation.

transplant

noun
1. Any organ or tissue that has been transplanted. See Corneal transplant, Domino liver transplant, Fetal mesencephalic tissue transplant, Laryngeal nerve transplant, Solid organ transplant.
2. The process of transplanting an organ or tissue; transplantation verb To transplant an organ or tissue.

trans·plant

(trans-plant, transplant)
1. To transfer from one part to another, as in grafting and transplantation.
2. The tissue or organ in grafting and transplantation.
See also: graft
[trans- + L. planto, to plant]

trans·plant

(trans-plant, transplant)
1. To transfer from one part to another, as in grafting and transplantation.
2. The tissue or organ in grafting and transplantation.
See also: graft
[trans- + L. planto, to plant]

transplant,

v 1. to remove and plant in another place, as from one body or part of a body to another.
n 2. implantation of living or nonliving tissue or bone into another part of the body; it then serves as a scaffold in the healing process and is progressively resorbed and replaced by newly formed bone.
v 3. to move a tooth or tissue from one site to another, often but not always autogenously.
transplantation, allogenic bone marrow
n the transfer of healthy bone marrow taken from a sibling in order to stimulate normal blood cell production.

transplant

1. an organ or tissue taken from the body and grafted into another area of the same individual or another individual.
2. to transfer tissue from one part to another or from one individual to another.

ovum transplant
see ovum transplant.
transplant rejection

Patient discussion about transplant

Q. What is a bone marrow transplant? I wanted to enter myself as a potential bone marrow donor and wanted to know first of all what bone marrow is? What does a bone marrow transplant mean and how is it done?

A. Bone marrow is a soft, fatty tissue inside the bones. This is where blood cells are produced, and where they develop. Transplanted bone marrow will restore production of white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets. Donated bone marrow must match the patient's tissue type. It can be taken from the patient, a living relative (usually a brother or a sister), or from an unrelated donor. Donors are matched through special blood tests called HLA tissue typing. Bone marrow is taken from the donor in the operating room while the donor is unconscious and pain-free (under general anesthesia). Some of the donor's bone marrow is removed from the top of the hip bone. The bone marrow is filtered, treated, and transplanted immediately or frozen and stored for later use. Transplant marrow is transfused into the patient through a vein (IV) and is naturally carried into the bone cavities where it grows to replace the old bone marrow.

Q. Has anyone had experience with a corneal transplant because of keratoconus?

A. my uncle had to do a transplant- it took 5 weeks until he could see anything , another year to get his vision straightened up. but now he is fine! i know that he looked for information in the "National Keratoconus Foundation". they were very helpful (and nice!), they have a website with information on all forms of treatment:
http://www.nkcf.org/

good luck :)

Q. I would like to know what it takes to get on a liver transplant list.. I have been diagnosed with cirrhosis of the liver. I have been clean and sober now over 2 years... I have also been hospitalized more times than i don't like talking about but I have been admitted for high amounts of ammonia levels, low blood pressure, and dehydration

A. Thank you for your answer. At my next GI appointment, the doctors told me that to have someone else that i'd like to be there at which time he will explain it all to me and either my brother or sister because i've have been admitted so many times because of ammonia levels, my brain has hardly no memory left. Let's all with this disease stick together.

More discussions about transplant
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result of a detailed review of the AHCCS transplant program, six specific transplants recommendations were made that ultimately were passed into law.
For vision repair, Reh adds, a surprising aspect of the new report is that cells well on the path to becoming rods--rather than stem cells with more developmental options--appear to be the most promising transplant candidates.
He remembers how aggressive Myrna's cancer was and said he knew a bone marrow transplant was possibly the only cure.
Once the famous rabble-rouser recovers, "you'll be hearing a lot from him" on the issue of people with HIV fighting for organ transplants, promised McFarlane.
In the realm of some of the proposed applications for transplants, that can be difficult.
The OPTN is run under contract by a private corporation called the United Network for Organ Sharing, which is in turn run by the private institutions with an interest in transplants.
Second, Caplan notes that some would argue against equal access to liver transplants for those who are at a high risk of future harm to themselves.
Two major areas of research are methods of obtaining a sufficient number of cells to transplant and preventing rejection of transplanted cells.
Some people would begin answering this question by eliminating from the waiting list individuals who do not "deserve" a transplant.
That's why he volunteered for an experimental treatment: a bone marrow transplant from a baboon.
Duncan will also be using this rat for longterm oligo transplant experiments.
More than 245 lung transplants have been performed at Tampa General Hospital since launching the program in 2002.