transmural pressure

trans·mu·ral pres·sure

pressure across the wall of a cardiac chamber or of a blood vessel. In the heart, transmural pressure is the result of the intracavitary pressure minus the extracavitary (that is, pericardial) pressure and is the distending, that is, true filling, pressure of the cardiac chamber of measurement when this is done during diastole. Given that the pericardial pressure normally approximates zero, the filling pressure usually equals ventricular diastolic mean pressure, obviating the complexities of measuring pericardial pressure.

trans·mu·ral pres·sure

(trans-myūr'ăl presh'ŭr)
The pressure difference across the chest wall; the difference between pressure in the pleural space and the pressure on the body surface (i.e., pleural pressure-body surface pressure).
References in periodicals archive ?
Resistance exercise, the Valsalva maneuver, and cerebrovascular transmural pressure.
26) Structural components within the arterial wall, mainly collagen and elastin, together with transmural pressure, are key determinants of large arterial PWV.
Another possible theory is that the increase in end-expiratory lung volume, which may lead to increased transmural pressure gradients, may be associated with better UA patency.
5 Factors including cardiac pump function, the jugular venous wall tone, compliance and transmural pressure of IJV, and autonomic tone may affect the CSA of the jugular vein.
2])]], where the hemorrhage rate (Q) is the laceration area (A) times the square root of twice the transmural pressure change ([DELTA]P) divided by the blood density ([rho]) plus the velocity (v) squared.
This presumably leads to increased left ventricular systolic transmural pressure, which the left atrium resists, with resultant increased compliance and atrial overstretching, Dr.
Furthermore, Sampol and colleagues (41) suggest that the increased aortic transmural pressure may impose an additional risk of aortic dissection in OSA patients.
Pulsus paradoxus is related to an exaggerated change of the transmural pressure of the heart, or pulmonary blood vessels, or both during inspiration and expiration.