transference


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transference

 [trans-fer´ens]
in psychiatry, the unconscious tendency of a patient to assign to others in the present environment feelings and attitudes associated with significant persons in one's earlier life; especially, the patient's transfer to the therapist of feelings and attitudes associated with a parent or similar person from childhood. The feelings may be affectionate (positive transference), hostile (negative transference), or ambivalent. Sometimes the transference can be interpreted to help the patient understand childhood attitudes. See also countertransference.
counter transference see countertransference.

trans·fer·ence

(trans-fer'ents),
1. Conveyance of an object from one place to another.
2. Shifting of symptoms from one side of the body to the other, as seen in certain cases of conversion hysteria.
3. Displacement of affect from one person or one idea to another; in psychoanalysis, generally applied to the projection of feelings, thoughts, and wishes onto the analyst, who has come to represent some person from the patient's past.

transference

/trans·fer·ence/ (trans-fer´ens) in psychotherapy, the unconscious tendency to assign to others in one's present environment feelings and attitudes associated with significance in one's early life, especially the patient's transfer to the therapist of feelings and attitudes associated with a parent.
counter transference  see countertransference.

transference

(trăns-fûr′əns, trăns′fər-əns)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of transferring.
b. The fact of being transferred.
2. The process by which emotions and desires originally associated with one person, such as a parent or sibling, are unconsciously shifted to another person, especially to a psychotherapist or psychoanalyst during a course of treatment.

trans′fer·en′tial (trăns′fə-rĕn′shəl) adj.

transference

[-fur′əns]
Etymology: L, transferre
1 the shifting of symptoms from one part of the body to another, as occurs in conversion disorder.
2 (in psychiatry) an unconscious defense mechanism whereby feelings and attitudes originally associated with important people and events in one's early life are attributed to others in current interpersonal situations, including psychotherapy. The phenomenon is used as a tool in understanding the emotional problems of the patient and their origins. See also countertransference, parataxic distortion.

transference

1. The projection of attitudes, wishes, desires, libidinous and aggressive thoughts to another party, usually understood to mean to the psychoanalyst.
2. An unconscious responsiveness that contributes to the Pt's confidence in a therapist and willingness to work cooperatively. See Countertransference, Parataxic distortion.

trans·fer·ence

(trans-fĕr'ĕns)
1. Conveyance of an object from one place to another.
2. Shifting of symptoms from one side of the body to the other, as seen in certain cases of conversion hysteria.
3. Displacement of affect from one person or one idea to another.
4. psychoanalysis Generally applied to the projection of feelings, thoughts, and wishes onto the analyst, who has come to represent some person from the patient's past.

transference

The transfer of emotional wishes or thoughts experienced in relation to one person, to another person, especially a psychotherapist. Freud regarded transference in psychoanalysis as essential to success.

transference (trans·furˑ·enz),

n in psychotherapy and psychoanalysis, a client's feelings for the therapist. May be used to understand the origins of the client's emotional and psychologic problems.

Patient discussion about transference

Q. can hepatitis be transferred from fathers sperm when concieving a child? My partner has hepatitis C and he has gotten me pregnant will our baby have it too?

A. Here is taken from wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hepatitis_C#Transmission) :

Sexual transmission of HCV is considered to be rare. Studies show the risk of sexual transmission in heterosexual, monogamous relationships is extremely rare or even null. The CDC does not recommend the use of condoms between long-term monogamous discordant couples (where one partner is positive and the other is negative). However, because of the high prevalence of hepatitis C, this small risk may translate into a non-trivial number of cases transmitted by sexual routes. Vaginal penetrative sex is believed to have a lower risk of transmission than sexual practices that involve higher levels of trauma to anogenital mucosa.

Mother-to-child transmission of hepatitis C has been well described, but occurs relatively infrequently. Transmission occurs only among women who are HCV RNA positive at the time of delivery; the risk of transmission in this setting is approximately 6 out of 100. Among women w

More discussions about transference
References in periodicals archive ?
Put another way, he missed the opportunity to pursue the nature of transference as it developed in the intense dynamic set in motion in her therapy.
Although Bollas (1994) allows for a generative erotic transference that "implicitly recognizes the passion of a love relationship," (p.
An illuminating and enlightening overview of how transference and countertransference oscillated between sadism and masochism and, therefore, helplessness and revenge had been presented.
His exposition of the transference does justice to the complexity of its defensive structure, so that when he applies it to philosophy, postcolonial studies, film studies, and painting, he is able to make genuine theoretical and methodological contributions in each field while deepening his readers' understanding of psychoanalytic theory.
Transference and countertransference: Participants are given examples of definitions of transference and countertransference (e.
Freud first understood transference as the unconscious wishes and longings of the patient placed onto the person of the therapist.
The supplementary budget will be debated at the economic committee of the Council of Ministers to incorporate any necessary amendments and adequate transference in cooperation with the concerned ministries," he added.
The technology transference process study has detached the importance of the implementing phase that is seen as a dynamic process of mutual adapting between technology and its new environment, falling to the receiver being endowed with enough technological competences to incorporate this innovation (Figueiredo, 2003).
According to chapter 4, both director and directee need to be aware of transference (directed at the spiritual director) and countertransference (directed at the directee).
The advantage for us to do that is to be able to have transference of students from one school to the next," he says.
So far, the meetings have emphasised the transference of power in British tennis from the Englishman to the Scotsman.
In particular, Reardon-Anderson forcefully engages (and seeks to modify) the standard transference of frontier theories of Richard White, William Cronin and Frederick Jackson Turner familiar to American historians to non-American contexts.