transduction


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transduction

 [trans-duk´shun]
the transfer of a genetic fragment from one microorganism to another by bacteriophage.

trans·duc·tion

(tranz-dŭk'shŭn),
1. Transfer of genetic material (and its phenotypic expression) from one cell to another by viral infection.
2. A form of genetic recombination in bacteria.
3. Conversion of energy from one form to another.
[trans- + L. duco, pp. ductus, to lead across]

transduction

/trans·duc·tion/ (-duk´shun)
1. a method of genetic recombination in bacteria, in which DNA is transferred between bacteria via bacteriophages.
2. the transforming of one form of energy into another, as by the sensory mechanisms of the body.

sensory transduction  the process by which a sensory receptor converts a stimulus from the environment to an action potential for transmission to the brain.

transduction

(trăns-dŭk′shən, trănz-)
n.
2. The transfer of genetic material from one cell to another, especially a bacterial cell, through the use of a bacteriophage.

trans·duc′tion·al adj.

transduction

[-duk′shən]
a method of genetic recombination by which DNA is transferred from one cell to another by a viral vector. Various bacteriophages transfer DNA from one species of bacteria to another.

trans·duc·tion

(trans-dŭk'shŭn)
1. Transfer of genetic material (and its phenotypic expression) from one cell to another by viral infection.
2. A form of genetic recombination in bacteria.
3. Conversion of energy from one form to another.
[trans- + L. duco, pp. ductus, to lead across]

transduction

1. The conversion of energy in one form into energy in another.
2. The transfer of a gene from one bacterial host to another by means of a phage.
3. The transfer of a gene from one cell host to another by a retrovirus.

transduction

  1. the transfer of DNA from one bacterium to another, using a VIRUS as a vector. The donor is subjected to LYSIS, the recipient is infected with a transducing phage. See GENERALIZED TRANSDUCTION, SPECIALIZED TRANSDUCTION.
  2. the process of relaying a signal (e.g. a hormone) to an effector system to stimulate the appropriate cellular response.
  3. a process involved in conversion of one form of energy (e.g. light) into another (e.g. chemical).

transduction 

Generally, the conversion of one form of energy into another. Example: the transformation of light energy into receptor potentials in the photoreceptors of the retina (also called phototransduction). The absorption of light by the pigments of the photoreceptors triggers a cascade of biochemical events that leads to a change in ionic fluxes across the plasma membrane and to a change in resting potential from around −40 mV in the dark, to around −70 mV in light, that is a hyperpolarization of the cells. See depolarization; hyperpolarization; receptor potential; visual pigment.

transduction

the transfer of a genetic fragment from one bacterium to another by bacteriophage.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the preceding section we described advances in our understanding of signal transduction and the idea that nonmammalian systems could be used as models to evaluate the effect of test agents on key signaling pathways.
AxCell Biosciences of Newtown, PA, a subsidiary of Cytogen Corporation, is engaged in the research and development of novel biopharmaceutical products using its growing portfolio of functional proteomics solutions and collection of proprietary signal transduction pathway information.
The Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transduction and activation of transcription (STAT) pathway is an essential cascade for mediating normal functions of different cytokines in the development of the hematopoietic and immune systems (Cheng et al.
It may be used as a companion for a course on regulation and signal transduction as well as an introductory reference to the field for students and researchers.
Please contact Transduction Sales Team for additional information on TR-SABRE computer and custom quote: sales@transduction.
DNA, RNA, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, redox substrates, signaling molecules); 2) reactions of metal complexes within the cellular milieu and in vivo; 3) uptake of metal complexes into cells and delivery to specific cellular compartments; 4) interactions of metal complexes with specific enzymes and receptors; 5) mechanisms by which synthetic metal complexes recruit cell cycle, signal transduction, and other metabolic pathways to alter cell functions; and 6) structure-activity relationships for ligand design to control metal complex activity and stability in vitro and in vivo.
TheRyte Limited (Liverpool, England) has patented a method for measuring the sensitivity of a cancer cell to an anticancer agent, which method comprises testing a sample for the mutational status, expression, and/or function of a negative signal transduction factor, and testing the sample for the mutational status, expression, and/or function of a positive signal transduction factor, wherein when the method comprises measuring the radiosensitivity of wild-type p53 cancer cells by testing a sample comprising wild-type p53 cells or an extract therefrom for the abundance of Raf-1 protein by Western blotting, an antibody specific to Raf-1 protein is employed.
While at Eli Lilly, he spearheaded initiatives that incorporated state-of-the-art proteomics platforms for quantitative analysis of signal transduction pathways, including innovative mass spectrometry approaches.
For further information on the new TR-MS, contact a Transduction product specialist at 5155 Spectrum Way, Bldg.
Researchers in neurobiology, immunology, and related specialties provide a theoretical and practical foundation for scientists at any level who are interested in studying their role in signal transduction at the cellular level.
AntexBiologics (Gaithersburg, MD; 301-590-0129) announced that the United States Patent and Trademark Office has allowed another patent on Antex's Helicobacter pylori vaccine produced using the company's Nutriment Signal Transduction platform technology.