transcobalamin


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transcobalamin

 [trans″ko-bal´ah-min]
either of two plasma proteins, transcobalamin I and transcobalamin II, that bind and transport cobalamins, including vitamin B12 (see vitamin). Deficiency of transcobalamin II results in failure of immunoglobulin production, megaloblastic anemia, granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, and intestinal villous atrophy, and is correctable by vitamin B12 therapy.

transcobalamin

/trans·co·bal·a·min/ (trans″ko-bal´ah-min) any of three plasma proteins (transcobalamins I, II, and III) that bind and transport cobalamin (vitamin B12). Abbreviated TC.

transcobalamin

a group of proteins (of intestinal cells) that bind to cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12) and transport it to other tissues.
References in periodicals archive ?
TCN2 encodes for transcobalamin II which binds and transports vitamin B12 into the cell (Regec et al.
In the blood, transcobalamin transport vitamin B12 to cells of the body[sup.
B12 deficiency are often due to TC II transcobalamin transport protein, which is also caused by mercury, lead, antimony, and halogenated hydrocarbons such as PCB, PBB, DDT, and so on, that block methionine synthase enzyme.
Blood was collected at baseline for measurement of plasma vitamin B(12), transcobalamin (TC), holotranscobalamin (holoTC), methylmalonic acid (MMA), total homocysteine (tHcy), and serum folate.
gene deletions/polymorphisms) and ASDs, including reduced folate carrier (RFC); catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT); transcobalamin II (TCN2); glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1); glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1); 5, 10-methylenetetrathydrofolate reductase (MTHFR); metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 (MTF1); and divalent metal ion transporter SLCllA3 (116, 114-117).
After three to four hours, the vitamin B12 appears in the blood carried on transcobalamin II.
The intrinsic-factor cobalamin complex enters the intestinal mucosal cells by receptor-mediated endoycytosis where cobalamin is released, which then binds to transcobalamin.
Increased leucocyte alkaline phosphatase and transcobalamin III in chronic myeloid leukaemia associated with lithium therapy.
12] is then transported in the circulation to the tissues bound predominantly to transcobalamin II (TCII).
The licensing agreement grants Kyto patent rights to the Transcobalamin (Vitamin B12) Receptor and to an additional broad group of other patents which are critical to Kyto's research and development strategy for the treatment of cancer.
The author concluded that vitamin B12 dependency disorders are common and neglected by the medical profession because: (1) the body level of vitamin B12 needed for full biological efficiency is unknown; (2) patients might have a deficiency in transporting vitamin B12 into their tissues (low levels of transcobalamin 11); and (3) a large increase in a vitamin level might be needed to "force" one or more abnormal chemical reactions to proceed normally.