trans-fatty acids


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trans-fatty acids

stereoisomers of the naturally occurring cis-fatty acids, found in margarines and shortenings as artifacts after hydrogenation and in commercially baked cakes, cookies, pies, and crackers. A connection has been found between consumption of large amounts of trans-fatty acids and increased low-density lipoprotein levels and, thus, increased risk for coronary heart disease. Also called trans fats.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the study, researchers compared the number of admissions for myocardial infarction (MI) or stroke in 11 counties that restricted trans-fatty acids with 25 counties with no restrictions from 2002 to 2013.
Reported amount and percent reduction of trans-fatty acids (TFA) in selected products of companies that responded to the survey, Latin America and the Caribbean, 2009 Respondent company TFA content Percent and type of product in 2009 reduction (number of products or brands) (g/100 g of fat) since 2006 PepsiCo: Mexico and the Caribbean Chips (2) 0 0 Cookies and crackers (1) 0-0.
But it is important to control the overall fat intake in the diet - as well as reducing the intake of specific types of fat such as saturated fats and trans-fatty acids.
It has it all: a carbohydrate that causes a rapid rise in blood glucose, fried at high temperature in, usually, trans-fatty acids and, due to cooking a carbohydrate at such high temperature, contains acrylamide, a substance believed to cause cancer'.
The researchers in this study discovered that adding trans-fatty acids to a diet increased calcium deposits.
Trans-fatty acids are out, omega-3 fatty acids are in.
In general, the guidelines continue to recommend a saturated fat intake of less than 10% of total calories, but they go further to recommend that less than 3% of total calories be in the form of trans-fatty acids, which have been shown to increase LDL cholesterol and to reduce HDL cholesterol (Circulation 102[18]:2284-99, 2000).
The softer products were found to be healthier because the harder ones have more of what are called trans-fatty acids, which raise cholesterol and the risk of heart disease.
CALLS have been made for Governments across Europe to consider legislation to limit the amount of trans-fatty acids in food which are putting people's heart health at risk.
Conversely, intake of trans-fatty acids and foods with a high glycemic index may be harmful to heart health.
However, the review also suggests that the consumption of trans-fatty acids and foods with a high glycemic index may be harmful to heart health.
A new range of products that have been added by Stepan Company are free of trans-fatty acids, contain no genetically modified organisms and are certified kosher.

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