tracer


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Related to tracer: traces, tracker

tracer

 [trās´er]
1. a means or agent by which certain substances or structures can be identified or followed, as a radioactive tracer.
2. a mechanical device by which the outline of an object or the direction and extent of movement of a part may be graphically recorded; see also tracing.
3. a dissecting instrument for isolating vessels and nerves.
radioactive tracer a radioactive isotope replacing a stable chemical element in a compound (said to be radiolabeled) and so able to be followed or tracked through one or more reactions or systems by means of a radiation detector; used especially for such a compound that is introduced into the body for study of the compound's metabolism, distribution, and passage through the body.

trac·er

(trās'ĕr),
1. An element or compound containing atoms that can be distinguished from their normal counterparts by physical means (for example, radioactivity assay or mass spectrography) and can thus be used to follow (trace) the metabolism of the normal substances.
See also: tracing (2).
2. A colored or radioactive substance that can be injected in the region of a tumor (for example, melanoma, breast) to map the flow of lymph from the tumor to its nearest nodal basin; used in sentinel node detection.
See also: tracing (2).
3. A colored substance (for example, a dye) used as a tracer to follow the flow of water.
See also: tracing (2).
4. An instrument used in dissecting out nerves and blood vessels.
See also: tracing (2).
5. A mechanical device with a marking point attached to one jaw and a graph plate or tracing plate attached to the other jaw; used to record the direction and extent of movements of the mandible.
See also: tracing (2).
[M.E. track, fr. O. Fr. tracier, to make one's way, fr. L. traho, pp. tractum, to draw, + -er, agent suffix]

tracer

/trac·er/ (trās´er)
1. a dissecting instrument for isolating vessels and nerves.
2. a mechanical device for graphically recording the outline of an object or the direction and extent of movement of a part.
3. a means or agent by which certain substances or structures can be identified or followed.

radioactive tracer  a radioactive isotope replacing a stable chemical element in a compound and so able to be followed or tracked through one or more reactions or systems; generally one that is introduced into and followed through the body.

tracer

(trā′sər)
n.
An identifiable substance, such as a dye or a radioactive isotope, that is introduced into a biological or mechanical system and can be followed through the course of a process, providing information on the pattern of events in the process or on the redistribution of the parts or elements involved. Also called label.

tracer

Etymology: L, trahere, to draw
1 a radioactive isotope that is used in diagnostic x-ray techniques to allow a biological process to be seen. After introduction into the body, the tracer binds with a specific substance and is followed with a scanner or fluoroscope as it passes through various organs or systems. Kinds of tracers include radioactive iodine and radioactive carbon. See also radioisotope scan.
2 a mechanical device that graphically records the outline or movements of an object or part of the body.
3 a dissecting instrument that is used to isolate vessels and nerves. trace, v.

tracer

Imaging A substance, such as a radioisotope, used in imaging procedures

trac·er

(trā'sĕr)
1. An element or compound containing atoms that can be distinguished from their normal counterparts by physical means (e.g., radioactivity assay or mass spectrography) and can thus be used to follow (trace) the metabolism of the normal substances.
2. A colored substance (e.g., a dye) used as a tracer to follow the flow of water.
3. An instrument used in dissecting out nerves and blood vessels.
4. A mechanical device with a marking point attached to one jaw and a graph plate or tracing plate attached to the other jaw; used to record the direction and extent of movements of the mandible.
See also: tracing (2)

tracer

1. A biochemical that has been tagged with a radioactive atom so that its destination can be determined.
2. A length of nucleic acid tagged with a radioactive atom that can be used to find and identify samples of its complementary strand.

tracer

any rare ISOTOPE, for example radioactive forms such as 14C, which is administered in some way to organisms so that its fate may be subsequently followed within the organism or in the products of its METABOLISM.

trac·er

(trā'sĕr)
1. A mechanical device with a marking point attached to one jaw and a graph plate or tracing plate attached to the other jaw; used to record direction and extent of mandibular movements.
2. An element or compound containing atoms that can be distinguished from their normal counterparts by physical means (e.g., radioactivity assay or mass spectrography) and can thus be used to follow (trace) metabolism of normal substances.
3. Colored or radioactive substance that can be injected in region of a tumor (e.g., melanoma, breast) to map lymph flow from tumor to its nearest nodal basin; used in sentinel node detection.

tracer,

n 1. a mechanical device used to trace a pattern of mandibular movements.
2. a foreign substance mixed with or attached to a given substance to enable the distribution or location of the latter to be determined subsequently. A radioactive tracer is a physical or chemical tracer having radioactivity as its distinctive property.
tracer, Gothic arch,
n See tracer, needle point.
tracer, needle point,
n a mechanical device consisting of a weighted or a spring-loaded needle that is attached to one jaw and a coated plate attached to the other jaw. Movement of the mandible causes a tracing to be formed on the horizontally placed plate. When the needle point is in the apex of the tracing, the mandible is said to be in the horizontal position of centric relation.

tracer

a means by which something may be followed, as (1) a mechanical device by which the outline or movements of an object can be graphically recorded, or (2) a material by which the progress of a compound through the body may be observed.

radioactive tracer
a radioactive isotope replacing a stable chemical element in a compound introduced into the body, enabling its metabolism, distribution and elimination to be followed in the living animal.
References in periodicals archive ?
The South African diamond industry advanced the concept with the development of synthetic tracers in the 1970s (Napier-Munn, 1985).
On the first day the indoor tracer i-PPCH, released in the atrium, redistributed slightly differently than what was observed in the fall study for o-PDCH (released in the atrium in the first study).
Cybertrackers and skip tracers must have a complete knowledge and understanding of these three different sources of data and provide insight into which ones might be deemed the most effective for locating missing consumers in certain demographic and economic areas.
The measurement sections of partial RTD are shorter than that of global RTD, especially between Tracer port 2 and Probe 1.
Having peace of mind that--when the construction crews backfill--the tracer wire will not be displaced to the opposite side of the trench, will easily allow you to record on your as-built maps that the tracer wire is four inches to the house side or four inches to the road side of the gas pipe being installed.
Three, Glow Ammo does not trace as brightly as tracer ammo does, and you can't see it in broad daylight.
The TRACER program began in April 2007, but FOPEN has been in the field since the late-90s and is the result of a joint Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, U.
VM Tracer automatically creates, prunes, and opens VLANs (Virtual LANs) across the network infrastructure as new virtual machines are added, moved, or changed.
Tracer Quality Control Module, which enables an evaluator to review a call live or after it has ended and grade it based on predetermined criteria.
Standard 110 allows alternative tracer gas; however, it requires a "similar molecular weight.
Calcium kinetics analyses in humans today are based on serial measurements of tracer concentrations in ECF calcium (5).
The tracer methodology, initiated at the beginning of 2004, is a significant change from the survey agenda we had previously come to know.