toxoid


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Related to toxoid: tetanus toxoid, diphtheria toxoid

toxoid

 [tok´soid]
a toxin treated by heat or chemical agent to destroy its deleterious properties without destroying its ability to combine with or stimulate the formation of antitoxin.
diphtheria toxoid a sterile preparation of formaldehyde-treated products of the growth of Corynebacterium diphtheriae, used as an active immunizing agent, generally in mixtures with tetanus toxoid and pertussis vaccine (DTP) or with tetanus toxoid alone (DT for pediatric use and Td, which contains less diphtheria toxoid, for adult use).
tetanus toxoid a sterile preparation of formaldehyde-treated products of the growth of Clostridium tetani, used as an active immunizing agent, either in mixtures with diphtheria toxoid and pertussis vaccine (DTP, DT, Td) or by itself (T).

tox·oid

(tok'soyd),
A toxin that has been treated (commonly with formaldehyde) so as to destroy its toxic property but retain its antigenicity, that is, its capability of stimulating the production of antitoxin antibodies and thus of producing an active immunity. For specific toxoids, see entries under vaccine
Synonym(s): anatoxin
[toxin + G. eidos, resemblance]

toxoid

/tox·oid/ (tok´soid) a modified or inactivated exotoxin that has lost toxicity but retains the ability to combine with, or stimulate the production of, antitoxin.
diphtheria toxoid  the formaldehyde-inactivated toxin of Corynebacterium diphtheriae, used as an active immunizing agent against diphtheria, usually in mixtures with tetanus toxoid and pertussis vaccine (DTP or DTaP) or with tetanus toxoid alone (DT for pediatric use and Td, which contains less diphtheria toxoid, for adult use).
tetanus toxoid  the formaldehyde-inactivated toxins of Clostridium tetani, used as an active immunizing agent, usually in mixtures with diphtheria toxoid and pertussis vaccine..

toxoid

(tŏk′soid′)
n.
A substance that has been treated to destroy its toxic properties but retains the capacity to stimulate production of antitoxins, used in immunization.

toxoid

[tok′soid]
Etymology: Gk, toxikon, poison, eidos, form
a toxin that has been treated with chemicals or heat to decrease its toxic effect but that retains its antigenic power. It is given to produce immunity by stimulating the creation of antibodies. See also toxin, vaccine.

toxoid

Immunology A bacterial toxin or other antigen treated with formaldehyde to ↓ toxicity while preserving antigenicity; toxoids are used to prepare diphtheria and tetanus vaccines. Cf Freund's adjuvant.

tox·oid

(tok'soyd)
A toxin that has been treated (commonly with formaldehyde) so as to destroy its toxic property but retain its antigenicity, i.e., its capability of stimulating the production of antitoxin antibodies and thus of producing an active immunity.
[toxin + G. eidos, resemblance]

toxoid

A bacterial toxin that has been chemically changed so as to lose its poisonous properties but retain its ability to stimulate antibody production. Toxoids make excellent vaccines against infections characterized by exotoxin production, such as DIPHTHERIA and TETANUS.

toxoid

a substance produced from a toxin but in which the toxicity is destroyed while the property of inducing immunity to the toxin is retained. Used to immunize against toxigenic infections, for example DIPHTHERIA and TETANUS.

Toxoid

A preparation made from inactivated exotoxin, used in immunization.
Mentioned in: Diphtheria

tox·oid

(tok'soyd)
Toxin that has been treated (commonly with formaldehyde) to destroy its toxic property but retain its antigenicity, i.e., its capability of stimulating the production of antitoxin antibodies and thus of producing an active immunity.
[toxin + G. eidos, resemblance]

toxoid

a toxin treated by heat or chemical agent to destroy its deleterious properties without destroying its antigenicity. Most of the clostridial diseases, e.g. tetanus, are controlled by vaccination with toxoids.
References in periodicals archive ?
Percentage of women receiving tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) vaccination during pregnancy, by trimester--selected sites,* United States, 2006-2015
As a result, they commissioned laboratory testing that found beta HCG in the tetanus toxoid vaccine, despite conflicting assurances from Ministry of Health, they said.
Guillain-Barre syndrome after tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid and acellular pertussis vaccine: a case report.
Seven young and 36 elderly subjects completed the course of three toxoid injections.
The working group described the safety data on two Tdap doses as "'reassuring," noting that the tetanus toxoid vaccine has not been associated with an excess risk of adverse events.
This evolving epidemiology of pertussis has prompted ACIP to recommend a routine single Tdap dose for adolescents between the ages of 11 and 18 years who have completed the recommended DTP/DTaP (diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and pertussis/diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis) vaccination series and for adults ages 19 to 64 years.
Bingham, director of the rheumatology clinics at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, reported that relative to patients treated with methotrexate only, patients who were given rituximab plus methotrexate mount a comparable recall response to tetanus toxoid, a measure of retained immunity.
ACIP also clarified the poliovirus vaccination schedule that should be used with the combination vaccine DTaP-IPV/Hib (Pentacel), which contains diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and acellular pertussis adsorbed, IPV, and Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate (tetanus toxoid conjugate).
Adult protection may be better than indicated by serosurveys and may have improved in the United Kingdom with use since 1994 of combined tetanus-diphtheria toxoid vaccine instead of tetanus toxoid for injuries (5).
The tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccine, adsorbed (Tdap) was licensed in June for use as a single-dose booster immunization in persons aged 11-64 and was previously recommended by ACIP for use in adolescents.