toxicity

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toxicity

 [tok-sis´ĭ-te]
the quality of being poisonous, especially the degree of virulence of a toxic microbe or of a poison.
developmental toxicity the extent to which a toxin produces adverse effects on a developing embryo or fetus; see also teratogenesis.
maternal toxicity a toxic effect on a pregnant woman or nursing mother, as opposed to one affecting an embryo, fetus, or nursing infant.

tox·ic·i·ty

(tok-sis'i-tē),
The state of being poisonous.

toxicity

/tox·ic·i·ty/ (tok-sis´ĭ-te) the quality of being poisonous, especially the degree of virulence of a toxic microbe or of a poison.
O2 toxicity , oxygen toxicity serious, sometimes irreversible, damage to the pulmonary capillary endothelium associated with breathing high partial pressures of oxygen for prolonged periods.

toxicity

(tŏk-sĭs′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. toxici·ties
1. The quality or condition of being toxic.
2. The degree to which a substance is toxic.

toxicity

[toksis′itē]
Etymology: Gk, toxikon
1 the degree to which something is poisonous.
2 a condition that results from exposure to a toxin or to toxic amounts of a substance that does not cause adverse effects in smaller amounts.

toxicity

The sum of adverse effects 2º to exposure to a toxic substance, by mouth, through the skin or respiratory tract. See Amalgam toxicity, Botanical toxicity, Developmental toxicity, Digitalis/digoxin toxicity, Diphtheria toxicity, Excitotoxicity, Hashitoxicosis, Immunologic toxicity, Neurotoxicity, Nickel toxicity, Oxygen toxicity, Reproductive toxicity, Vitamin A toxicity.

tox·ic·i·ty

(tok-sis'i-tē)
The state of being poisonous.

toxicity

The quality or degree of poisonousness.

toxicity,

n the poisonous characteristics of a substance.

tox·ic·i·ty

(tok-sis'i-tē)
State of being poisonous.

toxicity

the characteristic or quality of being poisonous, especially the degree of virulence of a toxic microbe or of a poison. See also toxicosis.

toxicity rating
includes slightly toxic (with an oral LD50 in rats of 5000 to 15,000 mg/kg) up to supertoxic (with an LD50 of less than 5 mg/kg).
References in periodicals archive ?
need for the development of better drugs, and the need for more creative research into why the various toxicities occur, how to predict which patients are most vulnerable to which drugs, and better ways to prevent the problems from developing.