toxemia


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Related to toxemia: preeclampsia

toxemia

 [tok-se´me-ah]
1. the condition resulting from the spread of bacterial products (toxins) by the bloodstream.
2. a name formerly used to indicate a pregnancy-related syndrome typified by edema, proteinuria, and hypertension that was thought to be due to a toxin released by the mother in response to a foreign protein of the developing fetus. adj., adj toxe´mic.
toxemia of pregnancy former name for preeclampsia-eclampsia syndrome.

tox·e·mi·a

(tok-sē'mē-ă),
1. Clinical manifestations observed during certain infectious diseases, assumed to be caused by toxins and other noxious substances elaborated by the infectious agent; in certain infections by gram-negative bacteria, endotoxins probably play a role when the bacterial cell wall breaks down, releasing a complex lipopolysaccharide; however, the role of other bacterial substances is unclear, except in the case of the specific exotoxins such as those of diphtheria and tetanus.
2. The clinical syndrome caused by toxic substances in the blood.
3. A lay term referring to the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.
Synonym(s): toxicemia
[G. toxikon, poison, + haima, blood]

toxemia

/tox·emia/ (tok-se´me-ah)
1. the condition resulting from the spread of bacterial products (toxins) by the bloodstream.
2. a condition resulting from metabolic disturbances, e.g., toxemia of pregnancy.toxe´mic

toxemia

(tŏk-sē′mē-ə)
n.
A condition in which the blood contains toxins produced by body cells at a local source of infection or derived from the growth of microorganisms. Also called blood poisoning.

tox·e′mic adj.

toxemia

[toksē′mē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, toxikon, poison, haima, blood
the presence of bacterial toxins in the bloodstream. Also spelled toxaemia. Also called septicemia. See also preeclampsia. toxemic, adj.

toxemia

Gynecology A condition in which HTN and fluid retention occur late in pregnancy. See Preeclampsia.

tox·e·mi·a

(tok-sē'mē-ă )
1. Clinical manifestations observed during certain infectious diseases, assumed to be caused by toxins and other noxious substances elaborated by the infectious agent.
2. The clinical syndrome caused by toxic substances in the blood.
3. A lay term referring to the hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.
Synonym(s): toxaemia.
[G. toxikon, poison, + haima, blood]

Toxemia

Poisoning of the blood.
Mentioned in: Colonic Irrigation

toxemia (täk·sēˑ·mē·),

n the presence of bacterial toxins in the bloodstream. Also called
blood poisoning.
toxemia of pregnancy,
n condition encountered in pregnancy charac-terized by high blood pressure, proteinuria, and edema. May precede the onset of seizures (eclampsia). Also called
preeclampsia.

tox·e·mi·a

(tok-sē'mē-ă )
1. Clinical manifestations observed during some infectious diseases, assumed to be caused by toxins and other noxious substances elaborated by infectious agent.
2. Clinical syndrome caused by toxic substances in blood.
[G. toxikon, poison, + haima, blood]

toxemia (toksē´mēə),

n an abnormal condition in which there are toxic substances present in the blood.

toxemia

1. the condition resulting from the spread of bacterial products (toxins) by the bloodstream.
2. a condition resulting from metabolic disturbances.
Clinically there is depression, lethargy, separation from the group, reduced appetite, slow growth, poor production, low fecal output, weak pulse of normal rate, hemic murmur, weakness, albuminuria. There may be localizing signs such as pressure by an abscess. See also toxemic shock.

alimentary toxemia
toxemia due to absorption from the alimentary canal of chemical poisons generated therein; a form of autointoxication.
pregnancy toxemia
see pregnancy toxemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
1997 Pregnancy Methemoglobin levels complications significantly higher in women with anemia, toxemia, and threatened abortion/premature delivery (mean range 2.
This form was associated with very severe toxemia and high mortality rates, often in early stages of disease development.
Altered ferrokinetics in toxemia of pregnancy: a possible indicator of decreased red cell survival.
Wilde understands that because of her sudden, severe toxemia, the hospital staff had little time to prepare her for what was about to happen; even so, she was so traumatized by the experience that she almost gave up any notion of having mote children.
They include increased smoking among women, weight control during pregnancy to avoid toxemia and more surviving premature babies due to improved medical technology.
When the actress eventually became pregnant at the age of 45, her joy was short-lived when doctors diagnosed her with the condition toxemia.
For example, under the new guidelines, supplement manufacturers can promote a product's ability to ease leg swelling associated with pregnancy but not toxemia or other serious pregnancy complications.
Serious conditions such as toxemia of pregnancy or osteoporosis, will continue to be treated as diseases.
Any condition that affects the processes involved in normal urine production including renal disease, hypertension, toxemia, fever, paraproteinemia, postural changes, stress, exposure to cold, exercise, and salicylate therapy, may lead to proteinuria.
Kim developed toxemia in November 1994, and doctors admitted her to a hospital, where she stayed until the birth of their daughter in December.
Liver disease and faulty elimination, producing varying degrees of toxemia, and resulting in an acute nephritis with eclampsia, is a condition that may appear very suddenly.
In 1928, it was her black great-grandmomma, a melancholy woman who crawled several miles to Memorial Hospital to rid herself of a severe toxemia, that created the madness; screaming, but with no regrets, she pushed it out of her upset, nauseated stomach while down on her back on top of a rolling cart and, as a mean-spirited Garveyite, rebelliously gave it to Whitey before she passed.