totipotency


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to·ti·po·ten·cy

, totipotence (tō'tē-pō'ten-sē, tō-tip'ō-tens),
The ability of a cell to differentiate into any type of cell and thus form a new organism or regenerate any part of an organism; for example, a fertilized ovum, or a small excised portion of a Planaria, which is capable of regenerating a complete new organism.
[L. totus, entire, + potentia, power]

totipotency

/to·ti·po·ten·cy/ (to″tĭ-po´ten-se) the ability to differentiate along any line or into any type of cell.totip´otenttotipoten´tial

totipotency

[tō′tipō′tənsē]
the ability of a cell, particularly a zygote, to differentiate into any of a number of specialized cells and thus form a new organism or regenerate a body part. Also called totipotence.

to·ti·po·ten·cy

, totipotence (tō-tip'ŏ-tĕn-sē, -tĕns)
The ability of a cell to differentiate into any type of cell and thus form a new organism or regenerate any part of an organism.
[L. totus, entire, + potentia, power]

totipotency

the ability of a cell or tissue to give rise to adult structures. The capacity is often lost in adult cells (particularly in animals) which, having differentiated into one specific type, cannot change to another type of cell. see GURDON, CELL DIFFERENTIATION.

totipotency (tōˈ·ti·pōˑ·ten·sē),

n ability of a cell, specifically a zygote, to develop and differentiate into a complete organism or to regenerate a body part. Also called
totipotence.
References in periodicals archive ?
But, despite Shannon's contention to the contrary, it still seems to me that he does not recognize the full biological unity of the embryo, because he unduly fixes upon the totipotency of the preimplantation embryo's cells,(7) rendering flawed his account of what a biological part in this organism might be, an account that prevents him, in my judgement, from seeing its full ontological status.
For Shannon the port of entry into this discussion-and indeed the reason to affirm a distinction between genetic and developmental/ ontological individuality--is the so-called totipotency of early embryonic cells, a biological fact that serves as his principle of interpretation for all other data concerning the preimplantation embryo.
As I explained in my article, this latter totipotency of a cell in an early embryo to become an entirely other embryo is conditional.
Shannon does not share my concern to delineate these types of totipotency in the early embryo's cells.
Because of what may be their totipotency (that is, their ability to develop into not just many but all cell types), engineered ES cells could be introduced into early embryos, thereby producing chimeras--that is, embryos with genetic contributions from two sets of parents.
Fourth, I find the discussion of the totipotency of the cells of the preimplantation embryo problematic.
Johnson also claims that the cells in the morula, since they are in a fluid state because of their totipotency, have only "an incidental unity.
While the third problem, the most difficult, is primarily indebted to metaphysical and theological sources, I shall emphasize its biological character, because I believe that, paradoxically, the zygote's biological "totipotency" is quite restricted, so that claims against the individuality of the preembryo on the basis of totipotency are also attenuated.
In fact, to address "totipotentiality" directly, it seems that for all the discussion of developmental individuality, and inability to twin after implantation, the position of those who use the distinction between genetic and developmental individuality is, at root, that the totipotency of the blastomeres means that from conception to the formation of the primitive streak there really is no organism, no single living thing, present.
Cloning by blastomere separation is limited to the number of cells that can be separated before cell differentiation, which destroys totipotency, occurs.
However, the maximum stage at which a single blastomere can be reprogrammed to exhibit totipotency by itself or with cellular materials transplanted from other cells is unknown.