tort


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tort

Etymology: L, tortus, twisted
(in law) a civil wrong, other than a breach of contract. Torts include negligence, false imprisonment, assault, and battery. The elements of a tort are a legal duty owed by the defendant to the plaintiff, a breach of duty, and damage from the breach of duty. A tort may be constitutional, in which one person deprives another of a right or immunity guaranteed by the Constitution; personal, in which a person or a person's reputation or feelings are injured; or intentional, in which the wrong is a deliberate act that is unlawful. Many other kinds of torts exist. tortious, adj.

tort

Law & medicine An act deemed unlawful and capable of triggering a civil action; the wrongdoer–tortfeasor may be held liable in damages. See Malpractice, Negligence Opthalmology verb To rotate an eye on its anteroposterior axis.

tort,

n civil infractions (except for breach of contract) that result in injury entitling compensation. Includes but is not limited to trespassing, negligence, and defamation.

tort,

n a legal wrong perpetrated on a person or property, independent of contract.
References in periodicals archive ?
Schwartz, Reality in the Economic Analysis of Tort Law: Does Tort Law Really Deter?
159, 203 (1994) (characterizing tort reform as a "bitter turf war between plaintiffs' attorneys and corporate America"); Michael King, Fiddling While Texas Burns, AUSTIN CHRON.
Shapiro, Overcoming Under-Compensation and UnderDeterrence in Intentional Tort Cases: Are Statutory Multiple Damages the Best Remedy?
1994) (referencing several examples of considerations and questions taken into account by judges, academicians, legislator, and other important "players" in the debate over the deterrent effect of tort law).
Atiyah, who is generally grouped with pro tort reform scholars, noted that: "American tort law [can be seen] as the major means for setting norms and standards.
POSNER, THE ECONOMIC STRUCTURE OF TORT LAW 47, 58, 161-62 (1987) (explaining that tort judgments deter future misconduct).
should prefer Potter's spell to tort law, we would need a full
However, tort has other costs that Potter's spell might mitigate.
that tort liability may discourage doctors from disclosing information
of any set of tort doctrines is a function of all of the costs and
Economic Structure of Tort Law, famous for its defense of the claim that
much of tort law can be explained on the simple hypothesis that it