tooth avulsion

tooth a·vul·sion

the traumatic separation of a tooth from its alveolus.

tooth a·vul·sion

(tūth ă-vŭlshŭn)
Traumatic separation of tooth from its alveolus.
Synonym(s): tooth evulsion.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some common complications include nasal trauma, tooth avulsion, oral-pharyngeal laceration, laceration of the vocal cords, and tracheal laceration, perforation, and hypoxemia.
The covering physician should be aware that mandibular fractures may result in airway obstruction from bleeding, tooth avulsion, or posterior displacement of the tongue.
In cases where growth factors are absent, post-natal supplements have been proposed, while in cases of tooth avulsion or the lack of development, the growth of complete bioengineered teeth is being attempted.
Cultural as well as biological information can be recorded on bones - auditory exostoses (growths of bone in the ear canal caused by immersion in cold water), cranial deformation, trauma, and tooth avulsion.
In this context, tooth avulsion is a similar trait, becoming evident at about 7000 years b.
Burial patterning, the existence of cemeteries, biometric clines, necklaces, stone-hatchet trading patterns, and ritual tooth avulsion all point to widespread interaction between groups.
A case of a child with both a tooth avulsion and concomitant root fracture is described.
2) The NYSF also noted that victims of total tooth avulsions who do not have teeth properly preserved or replanted may face a lifetime dental cost of $10,000 to $15,000 per tooth, hours in the dentist chair, as well as possible development of other dental problems such as periodontal disease.
An important issue was omitted in your recent article on the proper management of tooth avulsions and extrusions ("Sideline Care Is Vital for Dental Injuries," Aug.
To prevent tooth avulsions resulting from basketball net entanglement, the authors of the JADA report recommend the following: