tissue culture


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culture

 [kul´cher]
1. the propagation of microorganisms or of living tissue cells in special media conducive to their growth.
2. to induce such propagation.
3. the product of such propagation.
4. the shared values, beliefs, and practices of a particular group of people, which are transmitted from one generation to the next and are identified as patterns that guide the thinking and action of the group members. adj., adj cul´tural.
cell culture the maintenance or growth of animal cells in vitro, or a culture of such cells.
blood culture microbiologic examination of a blood sample to check for presence of microorganisms.
continuous flow culture the cultivation of bacteria in a continuous flow of fresh medium to maintain bacterial growth in logarithmic phase.
enrichment culture one grown on a medium, usually liquid, that has been supplemented to encourage the growth of a given type of organism.
hanging-drop culture a culture in which the material to be cultivated is inoculated into a drop of fluid attached to a coverglass inverted over a hollow slide.
primary culture a cell or tissue culture made by direct transfer from a natural source to an artificial medium.
selective culture one grown on a medium, usually solid, that has been supplemented to encourage the growth of a single species of microorganism. It may also include substances that inhibit the growth of other species.
shake culture a culture made by inoculating warm liquid agar culture medium in a tube and shaking to distribute contents evenly. Incubation of the resolidified culture allows the development of separated colonies; especially adaptable to obligate anaerobes.
slant culture one made on the surface of solidified medium in a tube which has been tilted to provide a greater surface area for growth.
culture-specific syndrome folk illnesses that are unique to a particular culture or geographical area. Each illness has a cluster of symptoms, signs, and behavioral changes that are recognized by members of the culture; usually, they also have a range of symbolic meanings and culturally agreed-upon treatments. Anorexia nervosa and Type A behavior pattern are examples of syndromes specific to industrialized cultures.
stab culture a culture into which the organisms are introduced by thrusting a needle deep into the medium.
streak culture a culture in which the surface of a solid medium is inoculated by drawing across it, in a zig-zag fashion, a wire inoculating loop carrying the inoculum.
suspension culture a culture in which cells multiply while suspended in a suitable medium.
tissue culture the maintaining or growing of tissue, organ primordia, or the whole or part of an organ in vitro so as to preserve its architecture and function.
type culture a culture of a species of microorganism usually maintained in a central collection of type cultures.

tis·sue cul·ture

the maintenance of live tissue after removal from the body, by placing in a vessel with a sterile nutritive medium.

tissue culture

n.
1. The technique or process of maintaining or cultivating cells or tissues derived from a living organism in a culture medium.
2. A culture of cells or tissue grown by this technique or process.

tissue culture

Etymology: OFr, tissu + L, colere, to cultivate
the maintenance of growth in vitro, under artificial conditions, of tissue or organ specimens.

tis·sue cul·ture

(tish'ū kŭl'chŭr)
The maintenance of live tissue after removal from the body, by placing in a vessel with a sterile nutritive medium.

tissue culture

The artificial growth of sheets of human tissue in the laboratory. Tumour cells are readily cultured and some appear to be immortal. These are widely used for laboratory purposes. Normal skin cells (keratinocytes) can be cultured and used for grafting in the same person. Three-layered arteries have been grown as have sheets of urethral endothelium for purposes of urethral reconstitution in hypospadias. It has even been possible to grow a new ear around a mould of polymer mesh.

tissue culture

a technique in which individual cells grow and divide in a bath of sterile, nutritive fluid which often contains hormones and growth substances. The method is used extensively in biological laboratories, for example in cancer research (see HELA CELLS), plant breeding and routine analysis of chromosome KARYOTYPES. see AMNIOCENTESIS.

culture

1. the propagation of microorganisms or of living tissue cells in special media conducive to their growth.
2. to induce such propagation.
3. the product of such propagation.

anaerobic culture
one carried out in the absence of air.
continuous flow culture
the cultivation of bacteria in a continuous flow of fresh medium to maintain bacterial growth in logarithmic phase.
explant culture
a small piece of tissue such as trachea or gut maintained in culture.
hanging-drop culture
a culture in which the material to be cultivated is inoculated into a drop of fluid attached to a coverglass inverted over a hollow slide.
primary culture
a cell or tissue culture started from material taken directly from an organism. Subsequent passages of cells are referred to as secondary cultures.
secondary culture
a subculture derived from a primary culture.
slant culture
one made on the surface of solidified medium in a tube which has been tilted when the agar was solidifying to provide a greater surface area for growth.
stab culture
a culture into which the organisms are introduced by thrusting a needle deep into the medium.
streak culture
one in which the medium is inoculated by drawing an infected wire loop across it.
suspension culture
a culture in which cells multiply while suspended in a suitable liquid medium.
tissue culture
the maintaining or growing of tissue, organ primordia, or the whole or part of an organ in vitro so as to preserve its architecture and function. Used loosely to refer to monolayer cell cultures. See explant culture (above).
type culture
a culture of a species of microorganism usually maintained in a central reference collection of type or standard organisms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the major players in the e-cell and tissue culture supplies market are Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc.
Present at the press conference were Ministry of Environment's Biotechnology expert Dr Khaled El Mabrouk Suliman Elmeer, Tissue Culture Laboratory head Kamla Ibrahim al-Romaihi, researcher Sara al-Hammadi, SHT Strategic Planning director Dr Susie Perera De Silva and Business Development manager Sumedha De Silva.
The present and future utility of plant tissue culture is closely linked to success in regenerating whole plants from cultured plant materials, but regeneration is possible in some but not all species.
Any tissue culture media has all the ingredients we think a plant needs to survive.
Lab researchers found tissue culture expands the possibility of studying corn, soybeans, and other crops.
Using a 3-dimensional tissue culture model of head and neck mucosa, researchers at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill found that adenoviruses are able to infect only the most undifferentiated cell layers.
As more and more companies have entered the flower business, Celtis Labs has diversified from flower production into tissue culture, a technology where one flower is cloned into thousands.
Elmstrom, who is a watermelon breeder, and Gray, a tissue culture expert, collaborated on the tissue culture process that clones thousands of watermelon plants in months from breeding lines that normally produce so few seeds, it takes 10 to 15 years to develop a new seedless strain.
If they can identify the genetic trait that controls dwarfing, then it may be possible to transfer that trait into commercial varieties that can be propagated with tissue culture.
With that plant, tissue culture takes about as long as leaf rooting (approximately a year), but it gives you many more plants from one leaf.
Our laboratories were able to provide evidence of the virus through Pap or Tzanck smear examinations, but these smears can vary greatly in sensitivity and specificity and thus run a poor second to tissue culture methods, which are the gold standard for herpes virus identification.