tinfoil

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tin·foil

(tin'foyl),
1. Tin rolled into extremely thin sheets.
2. A base metal foil used as a separating material, as between the cast and denture base material during flasking and curing procedures.

tin·foil

(tin'foyl)
1. Base metal foil used as a separating material, as between cast and denture base material during flasking and curing procedures.
2. Tin rolled into extremely thin sheets.

tinfoil,

tinfoil substitute,
References in periodicals archive ?
Opaque material like tin foil blocked the most amount of light so it would make the best sky-friendly lampshade.
They used to make straight for the tin foil, then they started buying Milkybars for the wrappers.
Carl, who lives in Bargoed with his wife, daughter and mother-in-law, said: "I'm an ambulance driver, so it all started when I visited a nursing home a few years back and saw that they had decorated the walls with tin foil.
If not, place tin foil lightly on the breast and put the bird back into the oven for approximately another half an hour or until it reads the correct temperature.
Open the tin foil pouch, flake the fish into chunks and put to one side.
A FARTOWN man lined a carrier bag with tin foil and stole two bottles of whisky from a supermarket.
Cover loosely with a sheet of tin foil if it's getting too brown towards the end of cooking.
HONEYCOMB AND BANANA BOATS Ingredients (serves 2) 2 bananas 1 Crunchie Bar 5-10g of glace cherries chopped small or sultanas Tin foil
Simon Smith, Brighton East Sussex TO stop the tops of boots from flopping over and developing creases put old tin foil or kitchen towel tubes in them before putting them away in the bottom of your wardrobe.
London, Dec 3 (ANI): The discovery of mosses in the stomach of "Oetzi the iceman", a 5,300-year-old mummy discovered in the Eastern Alps, has led to the suggestion that he might have been carrying a prehistoric version of tin foil and an ancient first aid kit.
Stuff the pocket with as much of the black pudding as you can, then make a sausage with the remaining black pudding by wrapping it in cling film, rolling it into a sausage, then cover with tin foil and roast with the pork.
After two seasons of staring at glaring fluorescent tubes in the middle of the living room I devised a homemade "reflector panel" system made of cardboard with tin foil glued to one side.