tick fever


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Related to tick fever: Lyme disease

tick

 [tik]
a blood-sucking parasitic arachnid; there are two types, hard and soft. Hard ticks (family Ixodidae) have a smooth, hard cover that shields the entire back of the male but only the anterior portion of the back in the female. Soft ticks (family Argasidae) lack this shield. Ticks are visible to the human eye. A hard tick can be seen on the skin, where it burrows into the outer layer with its knifelike tongue; it must be removed from the skin with care. Soft ticks do not bore into the skin. The two varieties carry different diseases but both thrive in the spring and early summer and inhabit wooded areas, brush, or grass.



Ticks serve as vectors for viruses causing colorado tick fever and some forms of encephalitis and for rickettsiae that cause such diseases as rocky mountain spotted fever and boutonneuse fever. A progressive ascending flaccid paralysis called tick paralysis may follow the bite of certain species, usually Dermacentor andersoni.
Removal of Hard Ticks. If hard ticks are extracted from the skin immediately, before they begin to suck blood, the chances of their transmitting disease are lessened; probably the only damage done will be an irritating itch at the site. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that ticks be removed intact with fine-tip tweezers. Once the head and body are removed, the tick should not be squeezed or crushed with the bare hands. The site should be washed with soap and water.
tick fever any of various infectious diseases transmitted by the bite of a tick. The causative parasite may be a rickettsia, as in rocky mountain spotted fever; a bacterium such as Babesia or Borrelia; or a virus, such as that of colorado tick fever.

tick fever

n.
Any of various febrile diseases transmitted by ticks, such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever and Texas fever.

tick fever

any of various infectious diseases transmitted by the bite of a tick. The causative parasite may be a Rickettsia, as in Rocky Mountain spotted fever; a bacterium, such as Babesia or Borrelia; or a virus, such as that causing Colorado tick fever.

tick fever

See Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

tick fe·ver

(tik fē'vĕr)
1. Any infectious disease of humans or other animals caused by a protozoan blood parasite, a bacterium, a rickettsia, or a virus, and transmitted by a tick.
2. The tick-borne variety of relapsing fever.
3. Synonym(s): bovine babesiosis.
5. Synonym(s): Colorado tick fever.

tick

a blood-sucking arachnid parasite. There are two types, hard and soft. Includes American dog (dermacentorvariabilis), argasid tick, bont (amblyommahebraeum), British dog (ixodescanisuga), brown dog (rhipicephalussanguineus), brown ear (rhipicephalusappendiculatus), brown winter (dermacentornigrolineatus), castor bean (ricinus communis), cayenne (amblyommacajennense), Gulf Coast (amblyommamaculatum), ixodid, lone star (amblyommaamericanum), pajaroello (ornithodoruscoriaceus), red-legged (rhipicephalusevertsi), Rocky Mountain wood (dermacentorandersoni), shingle (syn. moose, dermacentoralbipictus), spinose ear (otobiusmegnini), tropical bont (amblyommavariegatum), yellow dog (haemaphysalisleachi leachi) tick.

canine tick typhus
see canine ehrlichiosis.
tick collar
a neck collar made of a PVC resin which releases particles of insecticide over a period of several months and aids in the control of tick infestations in companion animals.
tick fever
hard tick
ticks of the family Ixodidae and members of Ixodes, Boophilus, Margaropus, Hyalomma, Rhipicephalus, Haemaphysalis, Aponomma, Dermacentor, Amblyomma, Rhipicentor spp. They have a hard chitinous shield on the dorsal surface of the body, on the entire back of the male but only the anterior portion of the female.
tick paralysis
the female of several species of ticks but most commonly Ixodes or Dermacentor spp. elaborates a neurotoxin that typically causes an ascending flaccid paralysis in many animal species and humans but particularly in companion animals and young food animals. Affected dogs first develop weakness and paralysis of the hindlimbs, then forelimbs and ultimately respiratory paralysis unless the tick is removed and, in some cases, treatment with hyperimmune serum is given.
tick pyemia
an infection of lambs caused by Staphylococcus aureus and transmitted by the bites of ticks. Newborn lambs die of septicemia or develop signs of arthritis, meningitis or dermatitis. Called also staphylococcal pyemia.
seed tick
see seed tick.
soft tick
ticks of the family Argasidae including Argas, Otobius, Ornithodorus spp. These ticks have no dorsal protective shield.
tick-stained
said of wool or fleece that is heavily discolored by the feces of sheep ked (Melophagus ovinus).
tick toxicosis
see sweating sickness.
tick vectors
ticks act as vectors of protozoa, bacteria, viruses, rickettsia.
tick worry
an all-embracing term to describe the debilitating effects of heavy tick infestations. Includes anemia, irritation by the ticks, local infection as a result of bites, secondary blowfly and screw-worm infestation.
References in periodicals archive ?
The potential for transmission of arboviruses by blood transfusion with particular reference to Colorado tick fever.
Intra-erythrocytic location of Colorado tick fever virus.
The development of Colorado tick fever virus within cells of the haemopoietic system.
Colorado tick fever virus: an electron microscopic study.
Sequence determination and analysis of the full-length genome of Colorado tick fever virus, the type species of genus Coltivirus (family Reoviridae).
Termination and read-through proteins encoded by genome segment 9 of Colorado tick fever virus.
Genetic relatedness of Colorado tick fever virus isolates by RNA-RNA blot hybridization.
Teratogenic effects of Colorado tick fever virus in mice.
Colorado tick fever simulating acute myocardial infarction.
Virus-induced leukopenia: Colorado tick fever as a human model.
Persistence of Colorado tick fever virus in red blood cells.
Serologic and molecular diagnosis of Colorado tick fever viral infections.