thrust


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thrust

Vox populi noun Pressure in a particular direction. See Recoil thrust, Rotational thrust.

thrust

(thrŭst)
1. To push forward abruptly.
2. The act, power, or result of thrusting.
[O.N. thrysta]

thrust

(thrust)
1. A sudden, forcible forward movement.
2. In physical medicine, a manipulative technique in which the therapist applies a rapid movement to tear adhesions and increase flexibility of restricted joint capsules.

abdominal thrust

Treatment of airway obstruction that consists of inward and upward thrusts of the thumb side of a closed fist in the area between the umbilicus and the xiphoid process. If the patient is conscious, the procedure is performed from behind the person standing; if the patient is unconscious, it can be performed while kneeling beside or straddling the patient and using the heel of the hand rather than a closed fist. See: Heimlich maneuver

CAUTION!

This technique is no longer taught for the unconscious patient as the American Heart Association Guidelines replaced it with chest thrusts or CPR compression.

jaw thrust

A maneuver for opening the airway of unconscious patients or of patients who cannot control their own airway, by jutting the patient's jaw forward, which in turn moves the tongue away from the back of the throat. This procedure is especially used to open the airway of patients with suspected spinal injury because the cervical spine is not moved during a properly performed jaw thrust.

subdiaphragmatic abdominal thrust

Treatment for patients suspected of having a complete airway obstruction. For conscious, standing adults, it consists of upward and inward thrusts of the thumb side of the rescuer's closed fist, coming from behind the victim, in the area between the umbilicus and the xiphoid process. See: Heimlich maneuver

substernal thrust

A palpable heaving of the chest in the substernal area. This is a physical finding detectable in some persons with right ventricular hypertrophy.
See: apical heave

tongue thrust

The infantile habit of pushing the tongue between the alveolar ridges or incisor teeth during the initial stages of suckling and swallowing. If this habit persists beyond infancy, it may cause anterior open occlusion, jaw deformation, or abnormal tongue function.
References in periodicals archive ?
The rare particles are being captured inside the microwave drive, and turned into plasma, which imparts thrust.
Continue with the cycles of back slaps and chest thrusts until help arrives.
The deformation progressively shifted to the Main Central Thrust and then to Main Boundary Thrust (MBT).
Rotate the thrust collar counterclockwise until it contacts the muzzle brake.
The lower velocity bypassed air combined downstream with the higher velocity engine exhaust to produce thrust that had a larger mass flow (but at an average velocity lower than that of the higher velocity jet flow) in order to provide higher propulsion efficiency.
The large-thrust Long March-5 launch vehicle has a lift-off thrust of 1,000 tons, which enables it to send a maximum payload of 25 tons to the near-Earth orbit and a payload of 10 tons to the higher geo-stationary orbit.
The turned-around thrust is slowing the plane down.
Hydrodynamic thrust bearings are usually annular pad bearings in which one of the moving surfaces rotates relative to the other mating surface.
4 : to press the acceptance of on someone <New responsibilities were thrust on her.
In these compressors, a thrust bearing is used to maintain the stable orbiting motion of the orbiting thrust plate as it is firmly pressed against the fixed thrust plate.
The autothrottle demanded an increase in thrust from the two engines but the engines did not respond," said the report.
A new load-equalizing thrust bearing that can be stacked to accommodate axial loads in diametrically limited spaces has been announced by RIDE Technologies.