thromboembolism


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Related to thromboembolism: pulmonary thromboembolism

thromboembolism

 [throm″bo-em´bo-lizm]
obstruction of a blood vessel with thrombotic material carried by the blood from the site of origin to plug another vessel.

throm·bo·em·bo·lism

(throm'bō-em'bŏ-lizm),
Embolism from a thrombus.
[thrombo- + G. embolismos, embolism]

thromboembolism

/throm·bo·em·bo·lism/ (-em´bo-lizm) obstruction of a blood vessel with thrombotic material carried by the blood from the site of origin to plug another vessel.

thromboembolism

(thrŏm′bō-ĕm′bə-lĭz′əm)
n.
The blocking of a blood vessel by a blood clot dislodged from its site of origin.

throm′bo·em·bol′ic (-ĕm-bŏl′ĭk) adj.

thromboembolism

[-em′bəliz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, thrombos + embolos, plug
a condition in which a blood vessel is obstructed by a blood clot (thrombus) carried in the bloodstream from its site of formation. The area supplied by an obstructed artery may tingle and become cold, numb, and cyanotic. Treatment includes quiet bed rest, warm wet packs, and anticoagulants to prevent the formation of additional thrombi. Embolectomy may be indicated, especially if the aorta or common iliac artery is obstructed. A thromboembolus in the lungs causes a sudden, sharp thoracic or upper abdominal pain, dyspnea, cough, fever, anxiety, hemoptysis, and associated electrocardiogram changes. Obstruction of the pulmonary artery or one of its main branches may be fatal. Thromboemboli are diagnosed by x-ray films, CT pulmonary angiograms, and other radiological techniques, including lung scans and angiography.

throm·bo·em·bo·lism

(throm'bō-em'bŏ-lizm)
Embolism from a thrombus.
[thrombo- + G. embolismos, embolism]

thromboembolism

An EMBOLISM caused by a dislodged THROMBUS.

Thromboembolism

A clot in the blood that forms and blocks a blood vessel. It can lead to infarction, or death of the surrounding tissue due to lack of blood supply.
Mentioned in: Splenectomy

thromboembolism

embolism originating from thrombus formation

throm·bo·em·bo·lism

(throm'bō-em'bŏ-lizm)
Embolism from a thrombus.
[thrombo- + G. embolismos, embolism]

thromboembolism,

n a condition in which a blood vessel is blocked by an embolus carried in the bloodstream from the site of formation of the clot. The obstruction of the pulmonary artery or one of its main branches may be fatal. Emboli are diagnosed by radiographs and other radiologic techniques.

thromboembolism

the lesion created by a thromboembolus. The exact form of the disease depends on the location of the thromboembolism, e.g. aortic, iliac, intestinal, pulmonary.
References in periodicals archive ?
Overall, any use of combined oral contraceptives resulted in a three times increased risk for venous thromboembolism, compared with no use in the past year.
Future studies are planned to assess urine fibrinopeptide B in other settings where D-dimer is used, including use of urine fibrinopeptide after anticoagulation to determine the risk of recurrent venous thromboembolism.
Arterial Thromboembolism (ATE) occurs when oxygenated blood flow from the heart to another part of the body (via an artery) is interrupted by a blood clot.
American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines: Recommendations for venous thromboembolism prophylaxis and treatment in patients with cancer.
2008) Venous Thromboembolism Risk and Prophylaxis in the Acute Hospital Care Setting (ENDORSE Study), A Multi National Cross Sectional Study.
What to do: It's too early to draw conclusions about thromboembolism and diet after only one study, but it's worth eating less red meat and more fruits and vegetables to reduce the risk of heart disease, diabetes, and colon cancer.
Up to 600,000 Americans suffer from deep vein thrombosis yearly, and more than 200,000 deaths are linked to venous thromboembolism each year.
Noting that prevention and treatment of venous thromboembolism among pregnant women "may reduce maternal morbidity and mortality and improve the outcome of pregnancy," the investigators conclude that "when prophylaxis is indicated, it should be initiated early in pregnancy.
The company is seeking an indication for venous thromboembolism in patients undergoing orthopedic procedures.
Atrial fibrillation that develops after cardiac surgery places the patient at risk for thromboembolism and stroke, both of which may require anticoagulants or blood-thinning agents to treat.
Genetic tests for risk factors for venous thromboembolism (1) are increasingly available.
The recently published All Party Parliamentary Health Select Committee Report on Venous Thromboembolism in Hospitalised Patients has helped raise awareness, but there is so much more to understand.