thirst


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thirst

 [therst]
a sensation, often referred to the mouth and throat, associated with a craving for drink; ordinarily interpreted as a desire for water.

thirst

(thĭrst),
A desire to drink associated with uncomfortable sensations in the mouth and pharynx.
[A.S. thurst]

thirst

(therst) a sensation, often referred to the mouth and throat, associated with a craving for drink; ordinarily interpreted as a desire for water.

thirst

(thûrst)
n.
a. A sensation of dryness in the mouth and throat related to a need or desire to drink.
b. The desire to drink.

thirst′er n.

thirst

[thurst]
Etymology: AS, Thurst
a perceived desire for water or other fluid. The sensation of thirst is usually referred to the mouth and throat.

thirst

(thĭrst)
A desire to drink associated with uncomfortable sensations in the mouth and pharynx.
[A.S. thurst]

thirst

The strong desire to drink, arising from water shortage (dehydration) causing an increased concentration of substances dissolved in the blood. This change is monitored by nerve receptors in the HYPOTHALAMUS in the brain, and thirst is induced by a nerve reflex.

thirst

sensation arising when there is body fluid depletion, in response to increase in local osmolality in the hypothalamus and to neural and hormonal signals related to decreased blood volume and/or blood pressure; accompanied by production by cells in the hypothalamus of the water-retaining antidiuretic hormone (ADH) and its release from the posterior pituitary.

thirst

(thĭrst)
Desire to drink associated with uncomfortable sensations in mouth and pharynx.
[A.S. thurst]

thirst

a sensation, often referred to the mouth and throat, associated with a craving for drink; ordinarily interpreted as a desire for water. Cellular dehydration also influences thirst and therefore water intake. Other factors may influence the role of the hypothalamus in maintaining water balance. See also polydipsia.

psychogenic thirst
see psychogenic polydipsia.
References in classic literature ?
I knew that in the ravines and gullies they might find a temporary hiding place, and even though they died there of hunger and thirst it would be better so than that they fell into the hands of the Tharks.
My thirst was gone, and I fairly loathed the water.
Dummling asked him what he was taking to heart so sorely, and he answered: 'I have such a great thirst and cannot quench it; cold water I cannot stand, a barrel of wine I have just emptied, but that to me is like a drop on a hot stone
For another day nothing occurred to break the monotony of my imprisonment or relieve the suffering superinduced by hunger and thirst.
Because, to contend successfully against the elements; against hunger, and thirst, and fever; against savage beasts, and still more savage men, is impossible
If we failed in finding that pool of bad water which the old Dom marked as being situated in the middle of the desert, about sixty miles from our starting-point, and as far from the mountains, in all probability we must perish miserably of thirst.
But from spiritual thirst, from anguish of longing for higher things, for dry firm land, for foothold on a fatherland which they never believed in because they never knew it.
When the Nome King and General Guph arrived they both made a dash to drink, but the General was so mad with thirst that he knocked his King over, and while Roquat lay sprawling upon the ground the General drank heartily of the Water of Oblivion.
His first conscious sensation was of thirst, which grew almost to the proportions of suffering with full returning consciousness; but a moment later it was forgotten in the joy of two almost simultaneous discoveries.
This howling, rising and falling, but never ceasing, continued throughout the night, and by morning all were suffering from the intolerable thirst.
One of the potencies of whisky is the breeding of thirst.
AN ANT went to the bank of a river to quench its thirst, and being carried away by the rush of the stream, was on the point of drowning.