thimerosal


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thimerosal

 [thi-mer´o-sal]
a mercury-containing compound used as a topical antifungal and antibacterial agent.

thi·mer·o·sal

(thī-mer'ō-săl),
Antiseptic used topically and as a preservative in vaccine preparations.

thimerosal

/thi·mero·sal/ (thi-mer´o-sal) an organomercurial antiseptic that is antifungal and bacteriostatic for many nonsporulating bacteria, used as a topical antiinfective and as a pharmaceutical preservative.

thimerosal

(thī-mĕr′ə-săl′)
n.
A cream-colored crystalline powder, C9H9HgNaO2S, used as a local antiseptic for abrasions and minor cuts.

antiseptic 

An agent that kills or prevents the growth of bacteria. This term is generally restricted to agents that are sufficiently non-toxic for superficial application to living tissues. These include the preservatives for eye drops and contact lens solutions. Examples of antiseptics are alcohol, benzalkonium chloride, cetrimide, chlorbutanol, chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide, thimerosal (or thiomersalate). Other agents that are too toxic to be applied to living tissues are called disinfectants and are used to sterilize instruments and apparatus. See disinfection; ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid; neutralization; sterilization.

thi·mer·o·sal

(thī-mer'ŏ-săl)
Antiseptic used topically and as a preservative.

thimerosal, thiomersal, thiomersalate

a mercury-containing compound used as a local antibacterial agent in the form of the tincture. Used also as a preservative in pharmaceutical preparations. Known as Merthiolate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thimerosal and the occurrence of autism: negative ecological evidence from Danish population-based data.
Similar to the effects of metals, thimerosal decreased MS activity in a dose-dependent manner, with OHCbl-based activity being more sensitive than MeCbl-based activity (Figure 5(a)), and this inhibition was associated with decreased GSH (Figure 4(e)) and decreased cysteine uptake (Figure 4(f)).
In a study conducted by Mrozek-Budzyn, Majewska, Kieltyka, & Augustyniak (2012) the relationship between neonatal exposure to thimerosal and child development showed a potential adverse association.
Activation of methione synthase by insulin-like growth factor-1 and dopamine: a target for neurodevelopmental toxins and thimerosal.
Animal studies on the specific effects of low-dose thimerosal (at concentrations found in vaccines) have shown negative effects on nervous tissues and system capable of affecting animal behaviour (17).
However, "it is safe for pregnant women and children to receive a flu vaccine that contains thimerosal," the agency stressed.
In Bahrain, we are using only single dose vials that are free from thimerosal so a major concern of the anti-vaccine lobby has been addressed.
The authors conclude that 20 epidemiologic studies have shown neither thimerosal nor MMR vaccine to cause autism.
Vaccine resisters are motivated by a range of convictions--immunization isn't "natural" (the wellness set), it's suspect because it's government mandated (Christian home-schoolers), and so on--but the movement got a huge boost from the controversy over the mercury-laden preservative thimerosal, which some theorized might be linked to autism.
Yet no epidemiological studies support this assertion; in fact, the rate of autism has continued to increase since thimerosal was removed from childhood vaccines in 2001.
In 1999, in response to data that suggested a link between incidence of autism and childhood exposure to thimerosal (a preservative commonly used in vaccines since the 1930s), the American Academy of Pediatrics and the U.
The Scare: Vaccines, specifically their thimerosal content, cause autism.