thiazide


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Related to thiazide: potassium sparing diuretics, Loop diuretics

thiazide

 [thi´ah-zīd]
any of a group of benzothiadiazinesulfonamide derivatives, typified by chlorothiazide; their primary medicinal use is as diuretics. See thiazide diuretics.

thiazide

/thi·a·zide/ (thi´ah-zīd) any of a group of diuretics that act by inhibiting the reabsorption of sodium in the proximal renal tubule and stimulating chloride excretion, with resultant increase in excretion of water.

thiazide

(thī′ə-zīd′, -zĭd)
n.
Any of a group of drugs that block reabsorption of sodium in the distal tubules of the kidneys, used as diuretics primarily in the treatment of hypertension.

thiazide

any of a group of benzothiadiazinesulfonamide derivatives, typified by chlorothiazide, that act as diuretics by inhibiting the reabsorption of sodium in the proximal renal tubule and stimulating chloride excretion, with resultant increase in excretion of water.
References in periodicals archive ?
The thiazide diuretics cause massive degenerative changes and cell death in the distal tubule in rats (16).
Thiazide diuretics act in the cortical collecting duct and thus impair urinary diluting capacity, but maintain concentrating ability, whereas loop diuretics, which act in the thick ascending limb of Henle, impair both urinary diluting and concentrating capacity.
Exposure to [beta]-blockers and thiazide or thiazide-like diuretics prior to the index date was noted for both groups (JAMA 2004;292:1326-32).
Specifically, thiazide diuretics, beta blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, and alpha blockers are less effective in some patients who use NSAIDs.
Each patient received one to three of these drugs: a sulfonylurea, a thiazide, loop diuretic, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, a triptan, celecoxib, amprenavir, or dapsone (a sulfone).
Hydrochlorothiazide is a thiazide diuretic used in the management of hypertension either alone or to enhance the effect of other antihypertensive drugs in the more severe forms of hypertension.
Combining low-dose thiazide diuretics with most classes of antihypertensive agents increases efficacy and adds little toxicity.
The following drugs may decrease the effectiveness of insulin, resulting in hyperglycemia: acetazolamide, albuterol, asparaginase, calcitonin, corticosteroids, cyclophosphamide, danazol, dextrothyroxine, diazoxide, diltiazem, diuretics, dobutamine, epinephrine, estrogens, ethacrynic acid, HIV antivirals, isoniazid, lithium, morphine, niacin, oral contraceptives, phenothiazines, phenytoin, somatropin, terbutaline, thiazide diuretics, and thyroid supplements.
Goals were met by 67% of patients taking a beta-blocker plus diuretic, by 65% of those taking a thiazide or thiazidelike diuretic, by 57% of those taking an ACE inhibitor plus hydrochlorothiazide, by 54% of those taking a calcium channel blocker, by 51% of patients taking an angiotensin receptor blocker plus hydrochlorothiazide, by 46% of those on ACE inhibitor monotherapy, and by 45% of those prescribed an angiotensin receptor blocker alone.
Calcium channel blockers, corticosteroids, estrogens, isoniazid, nicotinic acid, oral contraceptives, phenothiazines, phenytoin, sympathomimetics, thiazide diuretics, and thyroid supplements may cause hyperglycemia in combination with other antidiabetic agents, so blood glucose levels should be closely monitored when one of these drugs is added or discontinued.
Evaluate 24-hour urinary calcium secretion and add calcium, vitamin D, or thiazide if needed.