thermoreceptor


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thermoreceptor

 [ther″mo-re-sep´tor]
a nerve ending sensitive to stimulation by heat.

ther·mo·re·cep·tor

(ther'mō-rē-sep'tŏr, -tōr),
A receptor that is sensitive to heat.

thermoreceptor

/ther·mo·re·cep·tor/ (-re-sep´ter) a nerve ending sensitive to stimulation by heat.

thermoreceptor

(thûr′mō-rĭ-sĕp′tər)
n.
A sensory receptor that responds to heat and cold.

thermoreceptor

[-risep′tər]
Etymology: Gk, thermē, heat; L, recipere, to receive
nerve endings that are sensitive to heat or a rise in body temperature.

ther·mo·re·cep·tor

(thĕr'mō-rĕ-sep'tŏr)
A receptor that is sensitive to heat.

thermoreceptor

A sensory receptor that responds to heat.

thermoreceptor

a sensory nerve ending which is responsive to temperature change.

thermoreceptor

a nerve ending sensitive to stimulation by heat.

cutaneous t's
come in two varieties, cold receptors and warm receptors. Called also peripheral receptors although the latter include, besides cutaneous receptors, those in the mucosae.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The mechanoreceptors respond to indentations of the skin; the thermoreceptors to specific temperatures and changes in temperature; and the nociceptors to intense pressure or high heat.
The pulsing airflow increased the cooling effectiveness of the airflow by preventing the acclimatization of the thermoreceptors.
The hypothalamus, upon receiving input from peripheral thermoreceptors located in the skin and central thermoreceptors sensitive to blood temperature located in the body core (the organs within the skull and the thoracic and abdominal cavities), responds like a thermostat to this input by reflexively initiating appropriate heat-promoting or heat-loss activities via autonomic pathways, allowing the hypothalamus to anticipate changes of the core temperature (Marieb 2004).
Ultrastructure of invertebrate chemoreceptors, thermoreceptors and hygroreceptors, and its functional significance.
Thermosensitivity in lobsters may be mediated by distinct thermoreceptors or thermosensitive neurons as in some other invertebrates (Prosser and Nelson, 1981; Mon and Ohshima, 1995).
However, the actual thermoreceptors have not been identified in these species.
coastal New Hampshire) can range from 0 to 25 [degrees]C, but rates of change may be too slow to directly stimulate putative lobster thermoreceptors.
Ultrastructure of invertebrate chemoreceptors, thermoreceptors and hydroreceptors and its functional significance.