therapeutic misconception

therapeutic misconception

(mis″kŏn-sep′shŏn)
The mistaken impression held by patients enrolled in medical research trials that the research in which they are participating will be beneficial to them personally, i.e., that the investigation gives them their last best hope of a cure.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therapeutic misconception is common in the critical care environment, where most critical care health providers, who are first and foremost clinicians with the intent of providing best care to their patients, frequently fulfil a dual role of care provider and researcher.
Barsdorf said that the research team had addressed the issue of therapeutic misconception (i.
Eight studies from a 2011 conference of the Association for Research in Nervous and Mental Disease examine such topics as deep brain stimulation for movement and other neurological disorders, transcranial magnetic stimulation on the modulation of gamma oscillations in schizophrenia, increasing the validity of experimental models for depression, moving towards a generalizable application of central thelamic deep brain stimulation to support the regulation of forebrain arousal in the severely injured brain, and the ethics of research on deep brain stimulation for depression: decisional capacity and therapeutic misconception.
He explains how each of these conditions may be satisfied and applies his account to specific bioethics problems, such as the therapeutic misconception and the exploitation of subjects in biomedical research.
Ethics SIG: Therapeutic Misconception and Cancer Clinical Trials
The terminology has been criticized for its perpetration of the therapeutic misconception.
Their primary purpose is to help word the consent information to prevent therapeutic misconception and to ensure that the information includes all a subject needs to know to make an informed decision.
Therapeutic misconception and clinical trials in sub-Saharan Africa: a review.
Recognizing that consistent, accurate assessment of research subjects' motivations poses a big challenge to implementing a "motive test," Jansen nonetheless reasonably argues that identifying altruistic motivations can assist in assessing subjects' understanding, particularly by helping to determine whether patient-subjects are affected by therapeutic misconception.
They make decisions under the so-called therapeutic misconception, or some variant of it.
14) It is also widely recognized that researchers must be careful not to rely on the therapeutic misconception to increase enrollment in their studies; to do so would be exploitative because most participants want to decide whether to enroll on the basis of an accurate understanding of the nature of the research.
To the Editor: As two of the authors of the original paper describing the therapeutic misconception (Loren Roth was the third), we appreciate Jonathan Kimmelman's retrospective of the concept.
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