the Bethesda System


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the Bethesda System

Cytology A system for reporting results from pap smears, which provides a uniform format for cervical and vaginal cytologic specimens, classifying noninvasive lesions and standardizes the lexicon for cervical/vaginal cytology reports, providing clinically relevant information. See Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, High-grade squamous epithelial lesion, HPV, Low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion. Cf Papanicolaou system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Malignancy risk for fine-needle aspiration of thyroid lesions according to the Bethesda system for reporting thyroid cytopathology.
Features associated with locoregional spread of papillary carcinoma correlate with diagnostic category in the Bethesda System for Reporting Thyroid Cytopathology.
Kurman R J, Solomon D: The Bethesda System for Reporting Cervical/Vaginal Cytologic Diagnosis: Definitions, Criteria and Explanatory notes for Terminology and Specimen Adequacy.
Frable WJ: Litigation cells: Definition and observations on a cell type in cervical vaginal smears not addressed by the Bethesda System.
Criteria for atrophic vaginitis were chosen as described in The Bethesda System for Reporting Cervical Cytology (1) and included features of atrophy with the addition of acute inflammation to define vaginitis.
The Bethesda system represents a substantial advance in cervical cytology reporting.
Although the Bethesda System clearly states that such aspirates should be classified as nondiagnostic, (12) some pathologists prefer to classify such cases as negative under the assumption that the risk of malignancy in such a setting is lower than in other cases of nondiagnostic aspirates and the belief that reaspiration is unlikely to provide additional diagnostic information.
During the past few decades, the Bethesda system have begun to introduce a simplified and uniform classification scheme for reporting gynecologic, breast, and thyroid cytology by defining each diagnostic category in an attempt to facilitate follow-up decisions by our clinical colleagues.
The Bethesda System 2001 explicitly states that minimum cellularity criteria should be used for cervical cytology specimens, and there may be clinical instances (such as atrophy) when fewer cells are adequate.
Cervicovaginal cytology surveys have been used since 1994 and have evaluated practices related to implementation of the Bethesda System (TBS) terminology and reporting rates for interpretive categories used in Papanicolaou (Pap) testing.
11) However, even as reflex hrHPV DNA testing subsequently became the most common follow-up method for women with ASC-US Pap test findings, (12) the definition of ASC US shifted in The Bethesda System 2001 (TBS2001) (13) and liquid-based cytology (LBC) largely replaced conventional Pap smears.

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