testicular function

testicular function

A generic term for the ability of the testes to act as reproductive organs by producing sperm, and as hormonal organs by producing testosterone.
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An enzyme linked immunoassay for anti-mullerian hormone: a new tool for the evaluation of testicular function in infants and children.
The press release further indicated that the Company would seek guidance during this Type B meeting on its planned New Drug Application for Androxal for the treatment of secondary hypogonadism with preservation of testicular function, and that Repros believed that the NDA would be filed around the end of 2014.
9] If there is a testes or an ovotestis with predominant testicular function, the testes is likely to descend;[sup.
Certain phthalates--a large group of chemicals found in cosmetics, fragrances, solvents, and plastics--have been associated with markers of decreased testicular function in some human studies (4) and altered male genital development in animal research.
Carbendazim, an inhibitor of microtubule synthesis, directly alters testicular function via germ cell depletion, alterations of Sertoli and Leydig cellular functions [18].
It is well recognized that initiation of testicular function is dependent on the hypothalamic secretion of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) which in turn stimulates FSH and LH to act on the testis (76, 77).
Testicular Function after Torsion of the Spermatic Cord.
The study found that adverse fetal growth, exposure to maternal smoking, and a lower childhood growth trajectory were all associated with a subsequent decline in testicular function.
Though there are numerous medical conditions that can cause testicular pain, it is important to understand few of them that require immediate medical attention to prevent loss of testicular function.
A decline in testicular function occurs normally with the aging process, matched by involutional changes in the testicular parenchyma, including hypospermatogenesis, peritubular fibrosis, and hyalinization of tubules commonly resulting in a pattern resembling that of mixed primary testicular pathology.
Gary Wadler, a clinical associate professor of NYU's School of Medicine, came on with host Karl Ravech to explain how a male would generally take hCG if only they were concerned in "trying to reawaken their testicular function .

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