terror


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terror

 [ter´or]
an attack of extreme fear or dread.
night t's (sleep t's) pavor nocturnus.

terror

/ter·ror/ (ter´er) intense fright.
night terrors  pavor nocturnus.

terror

(tĕr′ər)
n.
1. Intense, overpowering fear.
2. Violence committed or threatened by a group, especially against civilians, in the pursuit of political goals.

terror

[L. terrere, to frighten]
Great fear.
References in classic literature ?
It certainly operated to prolong in their case, and to confirm to them as their only inheritance, those feelings of repugnance and superstitious terror with which the people of the town, even after awakening from their frenzy, continued to regard the memory of the reputed witches.
His terror rose to desperation; he rained a shower of kicks and blows upon Gunpowder, hoping by a sudden movement to give his companion the slip; but the spectre started full jump with him.
The terror which the woman and boy had been creating in Harriet was then their own portion.
I was in mortal terror of the young man who wanted my heart and liver; I was in mortal terror of my interlocutor with the ironed leg; I was in mortal terror of myself, from whom an awful promise had been extracted; I had no hope of deliverance through my all-powerful sister, who repulsed me at every turn; I am afraid to think of what I might have done, on requirement, in the secrecy of my terror.
But despite the providential loneliness of the road, there were one or two terrors that could not be disposed of so summarily.
The unhappy Isaac was deprived not only of the power of rising to make the obeisance which his terror dictated, but he could not even doff his cap, or utter any word of supplication; so strongly was he agitated by the conviction that tortures and death were impending over him.
Even her natural terror of being left alone in the awful jungle was submerged in a greater horror as she saw the man and the beast spring simultaneously upon their prey and drag it down, as she saw the handsome face of her preserver contorted in a bestial snarl; as she saw his strong, white teeth buried in the soft flesh of the kill.
It was Passepartout who, playing his part with a happy audacity, had passed through the crowd amid the general terror.
All about me gathered the invisible terrors of the Martians; that pitiless sword of heat seemed whirling to and fro, flourishing overhead before it descended and smote me out of life.
The man he addressed recoiled with terror, and only answered the few words of the Musketeer by pointing.
The nurse, having placed the beverage prepared by the doctor within reach of the patient, and locked the door, was listening with terror to the comments of the servants in the kitchen, and storing her memory with all the horrible stories which had for some months past amused the occupants of the ante-chambers in the house of the king's attorney.
He went about the house as usual, but, as might be expected, fled in extreme terror at my approach.