territoriality


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ter·ri·to·ri·al·i·ty

(ter'i-tō'rē-al'i-tē),
1. The tendency of individuals or groups to defend a particular domain or sphere of interest or influence.
2. The tendency of an individual animal to define a finite space as its own habitat from which it will fight off trespassing animals of its own species.

territoriality

[ter′itôr′ē·al′itē]
an emotional attachment to and defense of certain areas related to one's existence. Humans and animals generally establish a claim to or occupy a defined or undefined area over which they can maintain some degree of control.
The relatively stationary zones and invisible boundaries that regulate interaction

ter·ri·to·ri·al·i·ty

(ter'i-tōr'ē-al'i-tē)
1. The tendency of individuals or groups of people to defend a particular domain or sphere of interest or influence.
2. The tendency of an individual animal to define a finite space as its own habitat from which it will fight off trespassing animals of its own species.

territoriality

see territorial aggression.
References in periodicals archive ?
returning to territoriality instead invoke "international
Movement and territoriality of wintering Hermit Thrushes in southeastern Louisiana.
However, the borderless nature of the Internet and unconventional techniques employed by cyberterrorists render it challenging, if not futile, to apply the traditional doctrine of territoriality to cyberterrorism.
These include lack of breeding territoriality in males, small size, and (perhaps as a developmental correlate) absence of pelvic fins.
In other words, the efficiency argument in favor of territoriality is much weaker for U.
The District Court's decision is difficult to square with the objective territoriality principle, but it is consistent with a line of cases applying a more expansive effects-based approach to jurisdiction.
Second, while notions of statehood, sovereignty, and territoriality rightfully command a domain in directing the interworkings of nations, what were once appropriate historical pillars of international law are now but flawed premises of a global and transnational legal order that both defines and is defined by the afflictions of humanity instead of states, persons, and territory.
3) The issue of the territoriality or nationality requirement (article 12, paragraph 2) does not arise in the context of a Security Council referral.
Of the prehistoric papers, the most interesting to this reviewer are those by Mee and Cavanagh, which seek to situate the archaeology of Laconia within broader archaeological discussions of connectivity and territoriality.
foreign mark exception, an exception to the territoriality rule for
Rather, we are faced with a crisis that stems from the very structure of international law, one that is based on political concepts that have become obsolete: those of sovereignty, territoriality, and the nation-state.