terminal bronchiole


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Related to terminal bronchiole: respiratory bronchiole

bronchiole

 [brong´ke-ōl]
one of the successively smaller channels into which the segmental bronchi divide within the bronchopulmonary segments. adj., adj bronchi´olar.
respiratory b's the final branches of the bronchioles, communicating directly with the alveolar ducts; they are subdivisions of terminal bronchioles, have alveolar outcroppings, and themselves divide into several alveolar ducts.
Respiratory bronchiole. From Dorland's 2000.
( and see color plates.)
terminal bronchiole the last portion of a bronchiole that does not contain alveoli, i.e., one whose sole function is gas conduction; it subdivides into respiratory bronchioles.

ter·mi·nal bron·chi·ole

the end of the nonrespiratory conducting airway; the lining consists of simple columnar or cuboidal epithelium without mucous goblet cells; some of the cells are ciliated; numerous Clara cells also occur.

terminal bronchiole

ter·mi·nal bron·chi·ole

(tĕr'mi-năl brong'kē-ōl)
The end of the nonrespiratory conducting airway; the lining is simple columnar or cuboidal epithelium without mucous goblet cells; most of the cells are ciliated, but a few nonciliated serous secreting cells occur.
References in periodicals archive ?
And, finally, there were increased collagen fibres due to hyperproliferation of fibroblasts in addition to mononuclear cell infiltration around the terminal bronchioles (Figure-10).
Furthermore, we show that the principal sites of deposition of ambient particles and associated tissue remodeling are the terminal bronchioles and first-generation respiratory bronchioles.
C) Immunohistochemistry using a monoclonal rat anti-mouse neutrophil (allotypic marker clone 7/4) antibody showing the location of neutrophils (dashed arrows) near terminal bronchioles and in relation to macrophages containing O-MWCNT (solid arrows).
Finally, the researchers compared the number and dimensions of terminal bronchioles at different levels of emphysematous destruction.
Second, subtype H1N1 colonizes the epithelia of both the upper and lower airways, without any obvious preference, whereas subtype H5N1 remains confined essentially to the alveoli and terminal bronchioles.
In emphysema, a structural element (elastin) in the terminal bronchioles is destroyed leading to collapse of the airway walls and inability to exhale "stale" air.
This case illustrates the classic findings of carbon pigment deposition around terminal bronchioles, dust macules, and mixed dust fibrosis.
The virus's preference for type II pneumocytes, alveolar macrophages, and nonciliated cuboidal epithelial cells in terminal bronchioles "may contribute to the severity of the pulmonary lesion," they noted.
The Dutch researchers noted that the virus's preference for type II pneumocytes, alveolar macrophages, and nonciliated cuboidal epithelial cells in terminal bronchioles "'may contribute to the severity of the pulmonary lesion.
Deep inside the lungs, the air tubes are as thin as hairs, and are called terminal bronchioles.
Such particles, when inhaled, mostly deposit in the terminal bronchioles and alveoli (15).