tenure

(redirected from tenurial)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to tenurial: tenuring

tenure

[ten′yər]
Etymology: L, tenere, to hold
1 (in a university) a faculty appointment with few limits on the number of years it may be held.
2 a permanent appointment usually awarded to a person who has advanced to the rank of associate professor and who demonstrates scholarship, community service, and teaching excellence in a specific field of study.

tenure

Academia A status granted to a person with a 'terminal' degree–eg, doctor of medicine–MD or doctor of philosophy–PhD, after a trial period, which protects him/her from summary dismissal; tenured academicians are expected to assume major duties in research, teaching and, if applicable, Pt care fostering, through their activities, the academic 'agenda' of their respective departments or institutions. See Endowed chair, Lecturer, Professor. Cf Chair.

tenure

(tĕn′yĕr) [L. tenēre, to hold]
1. The holding of a property, place, or occupational assignment.
2. The specification that an employee (typically someone in an academic setting) may hold a position permanently unless he or she behaves with gross negligence.
References in periodicals archive ?
JFM stakeholders are stressing the need for the transfer of authority over forest lands through establishing tenurial agreements and custodian rights with local community groups.
Land tenurial pattern is similar both in south-east and south-west when shrimps are grown in privately owned lands (ESCAP, 1988).
As the tenurial status of the farmers changed from being owners to owner-operators to operators, there was an increase in their willingness to participate [TABULAR DATA FOR TABLE 5 OMITTED] in the WQIP.
Secondly, and related to the above, there are, historically, traditionally, and naturally, no tenurial rights on the lake.
Other studies document how tenurial insecurity reduces incentives for soil conservation and intensive cultivation and encourages land clearing in tropical areas (Thiesenhusen, 1991; Feder and Onchan, 1987; Panayotou and Ashton, 1992).
The good news is that where economic or tenurial policies encouraging land clearing have been changed - as in Costa Rica and Brazil, for example - deforestation rates have slowed.
The government is mandated to afford tenurial security to employees, but this is absolutely absent for contractual employees.
Definitely, it is to the credit of the reforms that tenurial relations were liquidated; at least with reference to that time-point (through leasing, new forms of tenancy could and did arise to some extent).
For those without proper tenurial instruments, we're going to serve you show-cause memoranda," she said.
Aromin said the pilot implementation of Rapid Land Tenure Appraisal (RLTA) which will expedite the issuance of a land tenurial instrument, particularly, land patents.
The DENR said it would also monitor air and water quality and validate tenurial instruments of businesses.
Overlapping institutional authority (Table 1) and the resulting complexity of tenure security evident in the study area affirms the existing argument that Game Management Areas have "sub-optimal tenurial structure" (Metcalfe 2005: 7) and claims by Sichilongo et al.